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Utilising IBM's MQSeries* Everyplace* product to read and write to Microsoft's Windows NT**/2000 Event log

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000015052D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Sep-16
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 1 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is an example use of a messaging product such as IBM's MQSeries* Everyplace* (MQe) product. By creating a custom descendent of an MQe Queue class overriding the getMessage, putMessage, browseMessage and deleteMessage methods so that instead of accessing a standard MQe Message object, it access the Microsoft** Windows NT**/2000 event log. This allows for both local and remote viewing/update of the standard Windows event log, it allows a very simple interface to be able to remotely monitor Windows NT system. i.e. a server can be monitored and actions automaticaly triggered when Windows NT events occur. Current Windows systems provide an application that runs on the same box as the event log, and an API that allows application programs to be written to extract/update the event log.

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  Utilising IBM's MQSeries* Everyplace* product to read and write to Microsoft's Windows NT**/2000 Event log

Disclosed is an example use of a messaging product such as IBM's
MQSeries* Everyplace* (MQe) product.

     By creating a custom descendent of an MQe Queue class
overriding the getMessage, putMessage, browseMessage and
deleteMessage methods so that instead of accessing a standard MQe
Message object, it access the Microsoft** Windows NT**/2000 event
log.

     This allows for both local and remote viewing/update of the
standard Windows event log, it allows a very simple interface to
be able to remotely monitor Windows NT system. i.e. a server can
be monitored and actions automaticaly triggered when Windows NT
events occur.

     Current Windows systems provide an application that runs on
the same box as the event log, and an API that allows application
programs to be written to extract/update the event log.

     Using this approach, allows a simple messaging interface
along with all the security (authentication, encryption,
compression) associated with MQe queues and associated network
connections.

     As a side effect of this technique, it means that any MQe
client can administer and/or control and Windows NT event log,
this could even be from a mobile telephone. Also triggers could
be setup to call a mobile phone when/if a certain types of
Windows NT events occur.

* IBM, MQSeries and Everyplace are registered trademarks of
International Business Machines Corporation.
** Microsoft, Windows and Windows NT...