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Recondition and rework of connector 5356165 by hot oil rework to remove soldered cables

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000015132D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Sep-03
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 1 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Due to the cost and availability of a particular type of connector, it becomes necessary to salvage the connector from assemblies from time to time. This particular connector uses cables directly soldered into solder cups on the connector. The current method to remove cables is to use a solder iron to reheat the solder and pull the cable wires out. This method causes solder splatter and often burns the thermoset plastic used to house the solder cups.

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  Recondition and rework of connector 5356165 by hot oil rework to remove soldered cables

    Due to the cost and availability of a particular type of connector, it becomes necessary to salvage the connector from assemblies from time to time. This particular connector uses cables directly soldered into solder cups on the connector. The current method to remove cables is to use a solder iron to reheat the solder and pull the cable wires out. This method causes solder splatter and often burns the thermoset plastic used to house the solder cups.

The present invention uses a hot oil bath to rework cable connectors by removing soldered wires from the contact system. Instead of removing the wires with a manual solder iron operation, the solder is melted in the hot oil and the wires are removed from the solder cups without burning or damaging the contacts or the exterior areas of the connector. This process keeps a constant temperature in the connector system that is hot enough to melt the solder, but not so hot that the connector is damaged.

The use of a hot oil rework process obviates the use of a solder iron which eliminates solder splatter and burned plastic such that the part itself looks new. Another advantage of the hot oil process is that several cables can be removed at the same time while the solder iron method only removes one cable at a time.

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