Browse Prior Art Database

A Method to Visualize Life Cycle Relation between two Variables in the Form of Linked Linear Lines

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000015156D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Sep-07
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 4 page(s) / 231K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

4 Patent Title: · A Method to Visualize Life Cycle Relation between two Variables in the Form of Linked Linear Lines · Purpose of the Invention:

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  A Method to Visualize Life Cycle Relation between two Variables in the Form of Linked Linear Lines

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Patent Title:

·A Method to Visualize Life Cycle Relation between two Variables in the Form of Linked Linear Lines·

Purpose of the Invention:

This invention is to provide an automated mechanism of capturing the index values of the effectiveness of a process and the productivity of executing the process by a team or an organization based on the variables that accumulate values spent during the life-cycle of the process such as the number of deliverables produced and the workload spent during the process life-cycle.

Scope of the Invention:

Visualization of the relationship between or among the variables that accumulate values spent during the life-cycle of a process.

General Description:

Figure-1 shows a system defined by a process P. A team or an organization executes this process and there exists a quantity that represents accumulation of quantity spent or generated during the unit of time. Two examples are the variables of ~Total workload~ and ~Total deliverables,~ as shown in the Figure. Here it is noted that ~the total workload~ variable does include workload directly spent on generating deliverables and not include workload, such as ~the level of effort~ for example, to be spent for support or maintain the process environment.

Generally we can think of a functional relation: y=f(x), where x and y are such input and output variables respectively. If the domain of the variable x is small enough, the next form of equation approximates the relation:

b(1) yax=⋅ ,

where the parameter a and b represent the characteristics of the process when it is executed by a team or an organization.

A process includes sub-processes inside. Figure-2 shows an example that the top-level process is decomposed into three sub-processes that are linked sequentially. Each sub-process may be interpreted as

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a phase if preferable. Each phase gives a different set of a and b that characterize the phase in term of the process effectiveness and the productivity achieved by the team assigned to the phase. In this case, by applying the basic formula (1) to the three phases, the more detailed estimation and control over the input and output variables of the relation will be achieved.

A method to obtain the values of a and b that characterize a process and the execution and the application are described.

(1) A method to obtain the values of a and b that characterize a process and the execution

1) Plot data points of (total workload yi and number of deliverables...