Browse Prior Art Database

Internet Data Center Value-Add Feature: Total Performance Capacity Engineering Concept

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000015215D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 1 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

This invention disclosure describes a concept allowing one to only engineer critical core components

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

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  Internet Data Center Value-Add Feature: Total Performance Capacity Engineering Concept

This invention disclosure describes a concept allowing one to only engineer critical core components
(e.g., firewalls, web application servers, routers, etc.) of any infrastructure architecture to a 50% maximum load at any given point-in-time. This disclosure, describing the Total Capacity Performance Engineering concept, implies that any critical unit is virtually 100% consumed (regarding machine resources & capacities) when it is operating at 50% capacity levels. This is necessary in order to allow for the additional buffer required in failing situations of other components - that is, when they fail and require transfer of processing capabilities to other devices.

The problem is that highly utilized components fail from time-to-time, thereby needing another component to re-direct the entire load for fail-over processing. This disclosure, the Total Performance Capacity Engineering Concept, solves this problem of insuring that 100% processing capability for an integral fail-over state exists, from one component to another component. The advantage to using this fail-over concept is that by planning and maintaining 50% of any component's utilization as "total capacity engineering," then transferring this 50% capacity to another machine also maintaining 50% capacity allows for 100% full machine utilization in an unpredictable outage situation, i.e. 100% high-availability. This concept is a pre-design concept, not one which is easily implemented post-design (or, post-implementation). Traditional infrastructures can overlook this important design concept, often times realizing this as a design quality point too late in the life-cycle, or maybe sometimes not...