Browse Prior Art Database

Wireless Device Integrated in a Cutting Machine Tool and Used for High Data Rate Communication and Information Transfer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000015420D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Dec-14
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 4 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed herein is the use of a wireless device in a cutting machine tool in order to transmit or receive information at a high rate between the machine and a network (internal and external), a second machine, or a peripheral device. The wireless device allows the machines to be independent from the network (no cable needed) and provides broadened connection possibilities. Each machine contains one such device, but only one device is needed for the whole building (depending of its size of course and the total bandwidth needed). The reason comes from the fact that waves in the Ghz range can propagate through obstacles like walls with little absorption. Several standards exist in the wireless world. Each is targeted for a specific application type (depending on the bandwidth and the mobility needed for the application). Differences between Europe and America also exist, but the current trend is to decrease the number of standards. HiperLAN1/2 and IEEE802.11a provide interesting standards for industry since they can fit its requirements and replace part of current Ethernet connections. The WLAN (Wireless Local Area Network) includes the following standards: HiperLAN1, HiperLAN2, HiperACCESS, HiperLINK, IEEE802.11, 802.11a, 802.11b, Bluetooth. The WLAN market is strongly increasing and is expected to generate a revenue between $2 billion [USA today, Jan 24, 2001] and $4 billion [Telecommagazine, October 2000] in 2004 with a 75% average growth per year forecasted [Hiperlan2 Group analysis]. Volume production is starting now. The majority of the access terminals are expected to integrate a wireless device by 2003-4. The provision of a wireless device in a cutting machine tool allows fulfillment of industrial requirements relating to data integrity, flexibility, bandwidth and provides a working solution for high rate information transfer. No cable is needed to connect the cutting machine tool to a network (local or external). Installation of the machine is easier, simpler and less expensive. No wired connection infrastructure needs to be installed in advance in the building. Multi-access connection with different end devices is possible.- Peripheral devices can be easily used and shared. The worker environment security is enhanced since no cable are needed (i.e. no obstacles).

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  Wireless Device Integrated in a Cutting Machine Tool and Used for High Data Rate Communication and Information Transfer

  Disclosed herein is the use of a wireless device in a cutting machine tool in order to transmit or receive information at a high rate between the machine and a network (internal and external), a second machine, or a peripheral device.

The wireless device allows the machines to be independent from the network (no cable needed) and provides broadened connection possibilities. Each machine contains one such device, but only one device is needed for the whole building (depending of its size of course and the total bandwidth needed). The reason comes from the fact that waves in the Ghz range can propagate through obstacles like walls with little absorption.

Several standards exist in the wireless world. Each is targeted for a specific application type (depending on the bandwidth and the mobility needed for the application). Differences between Europe and America also exist, but the current trend is to decrease the number of standards. HiperLAN1/2 and IEEE802.11a provide interesting standards for industry since they can fit its requirements and replace part of current Ethernet connections. The WLAN (Wireless Local Area Network) includes the following standards: HiperLAN1, HiperLAN2, HiperACCESS, HiperLINK, IEEE802.11, 802.11a, 802.11b, Bluetooth. The WLAN market is strongly increasing and is expected to generate a revenue between $2 billion [USA today, Jan 24, 2001] and $4 billion [Telecommagazine, October 2000] in 2004 with a 75% average growth per year forecasted [Hiperlan2 Group analysis]. Volume production is starting now. The majority of the access terminals are expected to integrate a wireless device by 2003-4.

The provision of a wireless device in a cutting machine tool allows fulfillment of industrial requirements relating to data integrity, flexibility, bandwidth and provides a working solution for high rate information transfer. No cable is needed to connect the cutting machine tool to a network (local or external). Installation of the machine is easier, simpler and less expensive. No wired connection infrastructure needs to be installed in advance in the building. Multi-access connection with different end devices is possible.- Peripheral devices can be easily used and shared. The worker environment security is enhanced since no cable are needed (i.e. no obstacles).

Currently, cutting machine tools are mainly connected to the network with a serial port such as the Ethernet standard. Data transmission must be through a cable (electrical or optical). Therefore machines are dependent on the physical network. Each machine needs its own cable, i.e. a specific installation per machine. The possible accesses to the physical network need to be installed in advance. If a machine is located in a room without access, a new network installation need to take place (consuming time and money). The machine can

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