Browse Prior Art Database

Carrier Boat With Holes for Pins With Double Shanks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000015431D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Dec-25
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 112K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a carrier boat design used for fast loading and orienting large quantities of pins, each having a shank of the same diameter and wherein the shank is divided by an enlarged shoulder into two shank portions of different lengths (see Figure 1).

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Carrier Boat With Holes for Pins With Double Shanks

Disclosed is a carrier boat design used for fast loading and orienting large quantities of pins, each having a shank of the same diameter and wherein the shank is divided by an enlarged shoulder into two shank portions of different lengths (see Figure 1).

Figure 2 is a detailed view of a standard prior art carrier boat, with examples of different pin shapes that can be loaded into the boat. To load pins, the carrier boat is placed into vibrating equipment (not shown), and vacuum is applied from underneath the boat. A sufficient quantity of pins is randomly placed over the boat, and the pins get inserted in the shank holes of the boat by action of vibration and vacuum. Figure 3 represents the type of problems occurring when a prior art boat as shown in Figure 2 is used to load pins having two shank portions of different lengths, similar to the pin of Figure 1. After loading, a random mix of pins having long and short shank portions in the shank holes of the boat results. Bent pins can also result.

The new carrier boat hole design is shown in figure 4. It is used for loading and for precisely locating pins or terminals, using the loading method described above. At the completion of the loading operation, all pins are positioned with their long shank down in the holes of the boat, as at (1) in Figure 4. Each hole of the new carrier boat includes a pin shank hole, and a counter bore (2), of a diameter larger than th...