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Method for Presentation Graphics Programs to Indicate the Stage in Multi-Stage Animated Presentation Slides

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000015660D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Aug-03
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 1 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Presentation graphics programs and packages such as Microsoft PowerPoint or Lotus Freelance Graphics are widely used today for business presentations. These programs allow the set up of screen show effects for a single slide. One particular example of a screen show effect is the staged appearance of graphical objects on the slide. For a multi-staged slide, the presenter has to perform an input device activation such as a keyboard button push or mouse click a repeated number of times, where each activation performs the next screen show effect in turn. A problem with this approach is that the presenter can become uncertain regarding the number of pending activations for the current slide. Accordingly, the presenter can perform too many or too few activations than desired. In the first case, succeeding slides are prematurely displayed and the presenter needs to backup. This typically requires to step through all stages again. In the second case, the presenter possibly skips some important detail(s). In either case, the flow of the presentation is disturbed with a loss of synchronization between speech and presented slides.

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  Method for Presentation Graphics Programs to Indicate the Stage in Multi-Stage Animated Presentation Slides

  Presentation graphics programs and packages such as Microsoft PowerPoint or Lotus Freelance Graphics are widely used today for business presentations. These programs allow the set up of screen show effects for a single slide. One particular example of a screen show effect is the staged appearance of graphical objects on the slide. For a multi-staged slide, the presenter has to perform an input device activation such as a keyboard button push or mouse click a repeated number of times, where each activation performs the next screen show effect in turn. A problem with this approach is that the presenter can become uncertain regarding the number of pending activations for the current slide. Accordingly, the presenter can perform too many or too few activations than desired. In the first case, succeeding slides are prematurely displayed and the presenter needs to backup. This typically requires to step through all stages again. In the second case, the presenter possibly skips some important detail(s). In either case, the flow of the presentation is disturbed with a loss of synchronization between speech and presented slides.

This problem can be solved by giving the presenter an indication of progress through a multi-staged slide. The advantage of such an indication is that it provides the presenter with the desired indication how far into a multi-staged slide progress has been made. Undesired disturbance of the flow...