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Method to control system access and operation based upon network domain

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000015667D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Jun-11
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 1 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Inventorying or asset management of PCs is one of the most expensive cost of ownership costs. On average, this costs runs $20 per PC per month according to IGS. While some of this cost is to maintain accurate records for write-downs, support and the like, some of this expense is to insure no PC is lost with valuable data without knowledge of its disappearance.

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Method to control system access and operation based upon network domain

Inventorying or asset management of PCs is one of the most expensive cost of ownership costs. On

average, this costs runs $20 per PC per month according to IGS. While some of this cost is to maintain

accurate records for write-downs, support and the like, some of this expense is to insure no PC is lost

with valuable data without knowledge of its disappearance.

This publication allows a corporate IT organization to designate where a PC could or could not be used. Therefore much of the concern or requirements to closely monitor the control of the PC would not be needed.

Essentially a non-volatile area within the PC BIOS is created that allows only an IT manager with certain rights to be able to specify a domain or range of domains where a PC could operate. This area in BIOS would be off limits to an end-user but accessible by the IT administrator locally or remotely. The BIOS will also contain a small TCPIP kernel that supports checking the active domain by issuing the TCPIP commands. During system boot the BIOS loads the TCPIP kernel and issues the IPCONFIG command to determine what domain the computer is attached to. It than compares this value to the valid domain values stored in the BIOS. If there is a match the system continues with the normal boot. If not a match (different domain or computer not attached to network) than the system does not boot thereby protecting the critical data conta...