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Grammar test tool for speech recognition applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000015759D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Apr-18
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Applications using speech recognition are becoming more popular. Among different methods to perform speech recognition, applications using speaker-independent predefined grammars are being widely used. One of the key components of a speech recognition application are the dialogs (interface between the human and the application). A dialog is a sequence of prompts and input based on predefined grammars. Grammars can range from simple words to complex phrases. For instance, an application asking for a date will need a grammar able to handle different ways of speaking a date. Using March 1st, 2000 as example, here is a (non-complete) list of possible ways of saying this date:

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Grammar test tool for speech recognition applications

    Applications using speech recognition are becoming more popular. Among different methods to perform speech recognition, applications using speaker-independent predefined grammars are being widely used. One of the key components of a speech recognition application are the dialogs (interface between the human and the application). A dialog is a sequence of prompts and input based on predefined grammars. Grammars can range from simple words to complex phrases. For instance, an application asking for a date will need a grammar able to handle different ways of speaking a date. Using March 1st, 2000 as example, here is a (non-complete) list of possible ways of saying this date:

- zero three zero one two thousand; march the first two thousand; first of march in two thousand; three one zero zero; three one double zero; three one double oh

How the grammar's developer can exercise the grammar to make sure it is working as designed, without the real application?

Disclosed is a grammar test tool for providing an easy way to test a set of speaker-independent predefined grammars created to be used in a voice application.

The tool flowchart is illustrated below:

1) a grammar containing the list of grammars to be tested (grammarList)
2) a list file mapping the grammar selected to the prompt to be played and to the grammar file/context to be loaded (grammarMap)

The tool will provide a grammar with the control word "New Grammar" and will use text-to-speech to play the prompts. More sophisticated versions can include prerecorded prompts.

The first...