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A method to predict accurate waiting time in call-center application

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000015855D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Oct-10
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

In case of call center service, it is important to know when the next call will be acceptable. The accepting time is estimated from remained time to process current receiving jobs and waiting calls. Processing time of not-started job can be calculated simply from profile of the job.

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A method to predict accurate waiting time in call-center application

    In case of call center service, it is important to know when the next call will be acceptable. The accepting time is estimated from remained time to process current receiving jobs and waiting calls. Processing time of not-started job can be calculated simply from profile of the job.

This document describes how to calculate remained time accurately at any point of processing job. This method can be applied to jobs with complicated flows, repeating or branching.

1. This system consists of a database server and clients. The database server stores data to calculate remained time of the jobs. Detail of the data is described at item 4. The clients execute applications represent the jobs.
2. As preparations, put checkpoints on the job, and number them. The numbers must different each other. If the job's flow contains repeating paths, each checkpoint on the paths has multiple numbers. Figure 1 shows flow of the job with branch and repetition. Each square box represents a checkpoint on the job, such as input customer information, printing forms, scanning documents, and so on.
3. When an operation passes a checkpoint, the application on the client notifies the number of the checkpoint to the database server.
4. The database server records time from the checkpoint to the end of the job, and stores it on a table. Table 1 is a sample of the table. Each row has operator name, job name, and recorded times. This t...