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Method for obtaining and controlling elevated temperature within a device contactor to prevent heatsinking at device test.

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000015935D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Oct-18
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-21
Document File: 3 page(s) / 95K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

A process to be used to control the device temperature during elevated electrical test is discussed. The primary objective of this process is to eliminate the heat sink path that normally exists from the device, through the contact elements of the test contactor and into the Device Interface Board (DIB) and electrical Test system

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  Method for obtaining and controlling elevated temperature within a device contactor to prevent heatsinking at device test.

   A process to be used to control the device temperature during elevated electrical test is discussed. The primary objective of this process is to eliminate the heat sink path that normally exists from the device, through the contact elements of the test contactor and into the Device Interface Board (DIB) and electrical Test system

With the current design of most automated module handler systems (see figure), the modules 12 to be tested at elevated temperatures (temperatures above room temperature) are held in a heat chamber 11 prior to being placed in the test contactor 13 for electrical testing. The handler heat chamber 11 is set to the required test temperature and it is assumed that once the device inside the module package 12 is at the required temperature that it will remain at that temperature during test. Of all the automated handler systems evaluated, none of them are able to maintain the device at the correct test temperature during electrical test. When the handler inserts the module12 into the test contactor 13, there is an immediate heat transfer from the device 12 through the contactor contact elements 14, through the DIB 15, through the Dib/Test System contact elements 16 and into the Test system 17. This problem is due to the fact that the electrical path for each device pad is also a heat path. Even on handler systems that have...