Browse Prior Art Database

On-The-Fly Webpage Creator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000016157D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Sep-29
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of serving web pages created on-the-fly by a human user (hereafter called the broadcaster) to a second user or users (hereafter called the client). This allows visual synergy between live or realtime conversations (via phone, chat, etc.) with minimal concerns about security settings and browser capabilities. This is done by providing an interface that allows the broadcaster to quickly generate html or other standard webpage code without directing the user to a new page, requiring any software or plug-in installation, or forcing the broadcaster to manually edit code then replace the code on the server. This is similar to many applications that create custom code on-the-fly like a search engine, but this invention allows a broadcaster to choose the content of the page to be served "on-the-fly." This invention is a method of providing rapid, on-the-fly web page generation by providing the broadcaster with an application developed to serve specific types of content that can be rapidly changed without any knowledge of web development. A user could be given a website address, which may include a code or password depending on the specific application. The broadcaster then generates a page with the correct information, and posts it to that URL. When the broadcaster needs to change something, he or she can generate a new page via the broadcaster interface (See Figure 1). Once the content is changed in the interface, this page is then refreshed either when the customer refreshes his/her browser or possibly via a client side javascript that refreshes the page (via polling). This page could still have all of the interactivity available in an ordinary webpage with the advantage of being served to a user when relevant to the conversation. Figure 1. Some examples of how this invention might be applied include:

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On-The-Fly Webpage Creator

Disclosed is a method of serving web pages created on-the-fly by a human user (hereafter called the broadcaster) to a second user or users (hereafter called the client). This allows visual synergy between live or realtime conversations (via phone, chat, etc.) with minimal concerns about security settings and browser capabilities. This is done by providing an interface that allows the broadcaster to quickly generate html or other standard webpage code without directing the user to a new page, requiring any software or plug-in installation, or forcing the broadcaster to manually edit code then replace the code on the server. This is similar to many applications that create custom code on-the-fly like a search engine, but this invention allows a broadcaster to choose the content of the page to be served "on-the-fly."

This invention is a method of providing rapid, on-the-fly web page generation by providing the broadcaster with an application developed to serve specific types of content that can be rapidly changed without any knowledge of web development. A user could be given a website address, which may include a code or password depending on the specific application. The broadcaster then generates a page with the correct information, and posts it to that URL. When the broadcaster needs to change something, he or she can generate a new page via the broadcaster interface (See Figure 1). Once the content is changed in the interface, this page is then refreshed either when the customer refreshes his/her browser or possibly via a client side javascript that refreshes the page (via polling). This page could still have all of the interactivity available in an ordinary webpage with the advantage of being served to a user when relevant to the conversation.

Figure 1.

Some examples of how this invention might be applied include:

1. A customer calls a florist to order a bouquet of daisies. The florist is out of daisies, but has a similar type of flower. However, the user will not ord...