Browse Prior Art Database

HTML Text Magnifying Glass

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000016158D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Jul-10
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 741K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

This invention addresses the problem of text readability of web pages for viewing on computer and portable display equipment, especially on small-sized or high-resolution displays. This idea could also be used to assist visually-impaired users that can read displays with magnification. Web pages are often designed to be viewed at a specific resolution (usually 800 x 600). This often means fixing the font sizes and optimizing the page layout for the particular resolution. Image contents decrease in size as resolution increases for the same size of display. This is due to the smaller dot pitch associated with increases in resolution. As a result, font and icon readability can become a problem with high-resolution displays. Pictures and images also reduce in size as resolution increases, sometimes to the point that important detail may be difficult to see for some users. In standard internet browsers, such as Microsoft's Internet Explorer, the font can be changed in the browser by forcing all web pages to use a particular font, by forcing them all to use a common cascading style sheet, or changing the browser settings to ignore fonts specified in the page. However, this may change the layout of the page and the page may loose differences in font sizes meant to group different text . These changes are often not anticipated by the page developers and page content is typically left unorganized, clutterred, or even confusing for the viewer (See Figure 1) below. Figure 1

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HTML Text Magnifying Glass

This invention addresses the problem of text readability of web pages for viewing on computer and portable display equipment, especially on small-sized or high-resolution displays. This idea could also be used to assist visually-impaired users that can read displays with magnification.

Web pages are often designed to be viewed at a specific resolution (usually 800 x 600). This often means fixing the font sizes and optimizing the page layout for the particular resolution. Image contents decrease in size as resolution increases for the same size of display. This is due to the smaller dot pitch associated with increases in resolution. As a result, font and icon readability can become a problem with high-resolution displays. Pictures and images also reduce in size as resolution increases, sometimes to the point that important detail may be difficult to see for some users.

In standard internet browsers, such as Microsoft's Internet Explorer, the font can be changed in the browser by forcing all web pages to use a particular font, by forcing them all to use a common cascading style sheet, or changing the browser settings to ignore fonts specified in the page. However, this may change the layout of the page and the page may loose differences in font sizes meant to group different text . These changes are often not anticipated by the page developers and page content is typically left unorganized, clutterred, or even confusing for the viewer (See Figure 1) below.

Figure 1

Image contents (pictures, icons, and text) can also be magnified by rendering the image with more pixels. In effect, this is what occurs when users change to lower resolutions from an LCD's native resolution, or use basic magnification applications. For example, a text character that is 9 x 11 (See Figure 2a below) pixels can be magnified

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by simply quadrupling the number of pixels and rendering it at 36 x 44 (See Figure 2b below). Simply quadrupling the number of pixels that create the image makes the text look blocky or pixelated. However, if larger font point sizes are used instead of simply scaling a fixed point size to a different resolution, the text will appear smoother and more readable. In Figure 2c below, the same font shown in Figure 2a is shown rendered at a larger point size. The same problem...