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Alphanumeric Input Simplification and Improvement for Keypad Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000016187D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Oct-12
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for quickly gathering accurate alpha-numeric data from keypad devices. Keypad devices such as telephones, ATMs, and point-of-sale devices do not often have associated alphanumeric entry keys (many phones do not have a Q or Z for instance) or if they do the method of entry is often slow and cumbersome (asking the user to hit a key repeatedly to signify a 'D' as opposed to a '3'). This process builds a special index of the data entry possibilities replacing non-numeric characters with a special key. The customer entry uses this special key (the key on the phone is one possible implementation) to represent non-numeric data. A sorting and matching process then matches the data entered with the possibilities generated and produces a match requiring minimal customer input. Scope and Use The scope and use of this invention can be described as follows: Customer input of alpha-numeric data is required. Customer data that is all numeric or all non-numeric is not generally improved by this process. The keypad input device does not provide quick or reliable entry of unique data. Many processes are used on keypad devices

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Alphanumeric Input Simplification and Improvement for Keypad Devices

    Disclosed is a process for quickly gathering accurate alpha-numeric data from keypad devices. Keypad devices such as telephones, ATMs, and point-of-sale devices do not often have associated alphanumeric entry keys (many phones do not have a Q or Z for instance) or if they do the method of entry is often slow and cumbersome (asking the user to hit a key repeatedly to signify a 'D' as opposed to a '3'). This process builds a special index of the data entry possibilities replacing non-numeric characters with a special key. The customer entry uses this special key (the '*' key on the phone is one possible implementation) to represent non-numeric data. A sorting and matching process then matches the data entered with the possibilities generated and produces a match requiring minimal customer input.

Scope and Use The scope and use of this invention can be described as follows:

Customer input of alpha-numeric data is required. Customer data that is all numeric or all non-numeric is not generally

improved by this process. The keypad input device does not provide quick or reliable entry of unique data. Many processes are used on keypad devices

today to solicit customer input, such as pressing the key which corresponds to the letter on the keypad or pressing a key sequence to represent the differences between a '3' and a 'D'. Finally, not all non-numeric data may be represented on the keypad (such as the letters 'Q' and 'Z' as well as any special characters such as '+', '-', '%', or any other non-numeric possibility. A back-end database contains possible customer data for validation and verification. In the real world this could represent

machine serial ids, model ids, part ids, account ids, employee iden...