Browse Prior Art Database

Provision of "location context" to assist in the delivery of location based services

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000016205D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Sep-16
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

This publication introduces the concept of a "location context" (e.g. at home, on the train) including the idea that one "location context" may apply to several physical locations. A method for setting location context is disclosed and this will enable the provision of appropriate location based services. There is a rapid emergence of technologies to determine a user's location. Examples include systems such as GPS (Global Positioning System) and a variety of approaches centred around detecting where a user is physically, based on the user's mobile phone signal. Whilst these various systems can provide an absolute (or relative) position, often, no information regarding location context is given. This may be of great importance for the delivery of appropriate services to a user as the following two examples illustrate. Consider a user travelling on a train. As the journey progresses their physical location is continually changing but they remain "on the train". Provision of location dependant services based upon the sole consideration of geographic coordinates will not be able to differentiate between a person standing by the side of the tracks and a person on the train passing by. However, the context information is potentially very different.

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Provision of "location context" to assist in the delivery of location based services

This publication introduces the concept of a "location context" (e.g. at home, on the train) including the idea that one "location context" may apply to several physical locations. A method for setting location context is disclosed and this will enable the provision of appropriate location based services.

     There is a rapid emergence of technologies to determine a user's location. Examples include systems such as GPS (Global Positioning System) and a variety of approaches centred around detecting where a user is physically, based on the user's mobile phone signal. Whilst these various systems can provide an absolute (or relative) position, often, no information regarding location context is given. This may be of great importance for the delivery of appropriate services to a user as the following two examples illustrate.

Consider a user travelling on a train. As the journey progresses their physical

location is continually changing but they remain "on the train". Provision of location dependant services based upon the sole consideration of geographic coordinates will not be able to differentiate between a person standing by the side of the tracks and a person on the train passing by. However, the context information is potentially very different.

Consider a user in a store. As they move around the store their physical coordinates

change but they remain in the store. Also they may be in any one of the company's stores. If there was a provision to set a location context which placed the user in the store, the retailer could provide information directly to all users in any of their stores based on this single context setting.

     In both of these scenarios the user is likely not to be concerned by their actual geographic coordinates but more the reason for why they are there and the services they may wish to receive. These will best be served by reference to "location context" rather than coordinates.

     An example of how location context is set will now be described. As the user approaches a suitably enabled location, a message is pushed to their location aware device (e.g. phone). One possible mechanism for doing this would be Bluetooth* or some other short range wireless technology. The user is given the option of allowing a location context to be registered for them or declining to have this set. If the user accepts the location context setting they would further be given the option of always accept...