Browse Prior Art Database

Microcode Verification using a Code Load ported to Linux for simulation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000016222D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a simulation approach that describes the simulation of firmware running on a controller application in a mainframe enironment. In server system development an increased focus is on the verification of the system microcode that makes up many characteristics of the server system. Given the fact that many different pieces of microcode communicate with each other and besides that they are running on different achitectural levels and engines it is of high importance that all types of microcode are verified prior to delivery to the raised floor. There was until shortly one level of microcode that was not included, since it was running on a small Power-PC controller an application that was not included in the simulation path. Many code problems were not found due to that fact. Including the Power-PC controller was not possible due to the fact of missing hardware and besides that the power-pc operating system and controller hardware makes it very difficult to interact with the simulation environment. Therefore the Controller Code was ported to a target operating system (Linux Environment) running without the native OS/Open operating system and the underlying processor hardware. This allows a simple and cheap reproduction on several systems running multiple simulation environments together. It interfaces from the Linux Server via networking to the service element on the one side and to an emulation system on the other side. It also includes the support of the native SSI protocol on a TCP/IP connection to the simulation environment without any change. Alternativly the controller hardware is supplied with a facility to reduce the transmission speed of the physical network to allow to connect to an emulation system. The cage controller software supports several protocols depending on the level of simulation connected to it. (broadcast mode and native local bus protocol). However, it always uses the standard transmission protocol to stay as close as possible to the reality. (always a challenge for simulation)

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Microcode Verification using a Code Load ported to Linux for simulation

      Disclosed is a simulation approach that describes the simulation of firmware running on a controller application in a mainframe enironment.

    In server system development an increased focus is on the verification of the system microcode that makes up many characteristics of the server system. Given the fact that many different pieces of microcode communicate with each other and besides that they are running on different achitectural levels and engines it is of high importance that all types of microcode are verified prior to delivery to the raised floor.

    There was until shortly one level of microcode that was not included, since it was running on a small Power-PC controller an application that was not included in the simulation path. Many code problems were not found due to that fact. Including the Power-PC controller was not possible due to the fact of missing hardware and besides that the power-pc operating system and controller hardware makes it very difficult to interact with the simulation environment.

    Therefore the Controller Code was ported to a target operating system (Linux Environment) running without the native OS/Open operating system and the underlying processor hardware. This allows a simple and cheap reproduction on several systems running multiple simulation environments together. It interfaces from the Linux Server via networking to the service element on the one side and to an...