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Fail-Safe Save for Files

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000016303D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Sep-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

At times, computer software applications will inadvertently corrupt files and that corruption can be transparent to the user. Once these corrupted files are subsequently saved by the user, the user destroys the working copy of the data file, such as a document, database, or presentation that the user began working with. Our idea is to check to make sure that the files are not corrupted before they are saved. Figure 1 shows a flow chart of our process. The process starts in step 102, where the user brings up an application. In step 104, the user processes a file via a foreground application, such as a document, a database, or a presentation. In step 106, the determination is made whether the user desires to save the file. If the answer is no, the process flows back to step 104 and the user continues to process the file. However, if the answer is yes in step 106, the process flows to step 108 where the file is saved to a temporary destination. This temporary destination may simply be a C:\TEMP directory on a hard disk or the temporary destination may be in cache. Our novelty is in step 110, where the file is opened from its temporary destination by a background application. This background application is an identical application to the foreground application that the user is using. However, this background application not the same physical application. It is an independent version of that same application. In step 112, the determination is made whether the background application could successfully open the file from its temporary destination. If the answer is no, the process flows to step 120 and abends. Step 120 tells the user that the file he or she is attempting to save is corrupted and that it should not be saved to the final destination. Thus, the user can go back to the final destination and reopen the pre-corrupt version of that file.

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Fail-Safe Save for Files

    At times, computer software applications will inadvertently corrupt files and that corruption can be transparent to the user. Once these corrupted files are subsequently saved by the user, the user destroys the working copy of the data file, such as a document, database, or presentation that the user began working with. Our idea is to check to make sure that the files are not corrupted before they are saved.

Figure 1 shows a flow chart of our process. The process starts in step 102, where the user brings up an application. In step 104, the user processes a file via a foreground application, such as a document, a database, or a presentation. In step 106, the determination is made whether the user desires to save the file. If the answer is no, the process flows back to step 104 and the user continues to process the file. However, if the answer is yes in step 106, the process flows to step 108 where the file is saved to a temporary destination. This temporary destination may simply be a C:\TEMP directory on a hard disk or the temporary destination may be in cache.

Our novelty is in step 110, where the file is opened from its temporary destination by a background application. This background application is an identical application to the foreground application that the user is using. However, this background application not the same physical application. It is an independent version of that same application.

In step 112, the determination is...