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Device for Selectively Enabling a Light Emitting Diode Diagnostic System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000016324D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Oct-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Light emitting diode (LED) hardware diagnostic systems, that diagnose to a single point of failure, are prevalent on entry level and midrange servers. They lead to reduced duration of repair (DRA), lower service cost estimates, and ultimately, lowered warranty expense. They are less prevalent in the enterprise server and enterprise storage server (ESS) space. One concern is that customers will attempt to service the complex storage systems themselves when presented with a simplistic LED "lightpath" diagnostic system, and in the process, damage other componentry and potentially lose business-critical data. While it is desirable that customers service simple customer replace units (CRUs) to lower service costs, unskilled personnel could damage the system if they were to attempt to repair more complex field replaceable units (FRUs) meant to be repaired by service technicians. A second concern is that an advanced LED diagnostic system will facilitate servicing by third party service organizations, increasing their competitive advantage. To implement and profit from an LED diagnostic system in the ESS space, a device that selectively enables and disables the LED system is disclosed.

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Device for Selectively Enabling a Light Emitting Diode Diagnostic System

Light emitting diode (LED) hardware diagnostic systems, that diagnose to a single point of failure, are prevalent on entry level and midrange servers. They lead to reduced duration of repair (DRA), lower service cost estimates, and ultimately, lowered warranty expense. They are less prevalent in the enterprise server and enterprise storage server (ESS) space. One concern is that customers will attempt to service the complex storage systems themselves when presented with a simplistic LED "lightpath" diagnostic system, and in the process, damage other componentry and potentially lose business-critical data. While it is desirable that customers service simple customer replace units (CRUs) to lower service costs, unskilled personnel could damage the system if they were to attempt to repair more complex field replaceable units (FRUs) meant to be repaired by service technicians. A second concern is that an advanced LED diagnostic system will facilitate servicing by third party service organizations, increasing their competitive advantage. To implement and profit from an LED diagnostic system in the ESS space, a device that selectively enables and disables the LED system is disclosed.

A typical embodiment of the device is a small "garage door opener" style wireless mechanism that when depressed actuates the LED diagnostic system for the more complex servicer-only components on the system being serv...