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Atomic Force Microscope and Optical Microscope on a Glide Height Tester

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000016334D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Nov-14
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-21
Document File: 3 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disks are routinely analyzed using spin test stands (STS). Hereby the disks are clamped at its inner hole to a spindle and the disk is rotated at a velocity of 10 RPM. During the test a measurement head (e.g. a glide or a write- and read head) is brought over both disk surfaces. The test heads are typically flying at a distance of several nm distance to the disk surface. Using STS techniques topography as well as magnetic defects can be detected very precisely. In US-A-6297630 and in research disclosure n428, vol 12, 1999, page 1676 a combination of a STS and other complementary analysis tools (CAT) are described. Hereby the detected defects in the disk are positioned that way that the area of interest can be analyzed by the CAT. The article, R. Berger, M. Hampel, F. Krause, F. Fleischmann, and A. Dietzel, "A Test System for Automated Characterization of Performance Relevant Storage Media Defects", presented at IEEE Intermag 2002 Conference, Amsterdam 28th April 2nd of May, Netherlands, describes a STS combination with a scanning probe microscope (SPM) to measure defect properties such as defect heights with a sub-nanometer precision. These measurements have been performed in a clean-room environment and the whole tool was placed underneath an acoustic chamber and situated on top of a vibration isolation table. Vibration isolations are essential because defects only a few nanometers height influence the performance of hard disk drives (HDD). Therefore disk vibrations have to be reduced during analysis with a CAT

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Atomic Force Microscope and Optical Microscope on a Glide Height Tester

      Disks are routinely analyzed using spin test stands (STS). Hereby the disks are clamped at its inner hole to a spindle and the disk is rotated at a velocity of 10 RPM. During the test a measurement head (e.g. a glide or a write- and read head) is brought over both disk surfaces. The test heads are typically flying at a distance of several nm distance to the disk surface. Using STS techniques topography as well as magnetic defects can be detected very precisely. In US-A-6297630 and in research disclosure n428, vol 12, 1999, page 1676 a combination of a STS and other complementary analysis tools (CAT) are described. Hereby the detected defects in the disk are positioned that way that the area of interest can be analyzed by the CAT. The article, R. Berger, M. Hampel, F. Krause, F. Fleischmann, and A. Dietzel, "A Test System for Automated Characterization of Performance Relevant Storage Media Defects", presented at IEEE Intermag 2002 Conference, Amsterdam 28th April - 2nd of May, Netherlands, describes a STS combination with a scanning probe microscope (SPM) to measure defect properties such as defect heights with a sub-nanometer precision. These measurements have been performed in a clean-room environment and the whole tool was placed underneath an acoustic chamber and situated on top of a vibration isolation table. Vibration isolations are essential because defects only a few nanometers height influence the performance of hard disk drives (HDD). Therefore disk vibrations have to be reduced during analysis with a CAT
(e.g. a SPM). We propose a disk clamp mechanism which reduces significantly vibration noise of the disk. Hereby, we support the disk edge at outer diameter during the CAT analysis using one of the two arrangement presented in Fig. 1. This support mechanism is withdrawn during the STS analysis. We have measured an improvement of noise by one order of magnitude using the disk clamp mechanism.

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Figure 1 Two mechanisms are outlined which support the disk which is clamped on a spindle. In the first case a support is pressed against the underside of the disk. This support is attached to a fixture which can be lifted (on) and lowered (o...