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Method for the efficient conversion of binary integers to decimal display format

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000016495D
Publication Date: 2003-Jun-25
Document File: 3 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for the efficient conversion of binary integers to decimal display format. Benefits include improved performance.

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Method for the efficient conversion of binary integers to decimal display format

Disclosed is a method for the efficient conversion of binary integers to decimal display format. Benefits include improved performance.

Background

        � � � � � A conventional solution uses an accumulator for each decimal digit. Each bit’s contribution to all the decimal digits is computed. Additional processing is required to perform the carry propagation. This solution represents a high amount of processing overhead.

        � � � � � Another conventional solution is to process the computation using a specialized end-user program that is part of an I/O library. Typically, the performance of these systems and programs is not an important consideration.

Description

        � � � � � The disclosed method is the efficient conversion of binary integers to decimal display format. A function accepts a positive binary integer as input. It is changed into pieces of approximately ten consecutive bits and stored in several accumulators, which represent groups of three decimal digits (see Figure 1). The low-order accumulator counts ones, tens, and hundreds. The next accumulator counts thousands, ten thousands, and hundred thousands. For example, 2^21 is 2,097,152, so the portion of the input that includes bits 21 to 31 are multiplied by 2 to compute their contribution to the third accumulator (the 10^6 accumulator) and by 97 for the second accumulator (10^3) and by 152 for the low order accumulator. The disclosed method has been implemented as a prototype that accepts 72-bit input.

        � � � � � After all the pieces of the input have made their initial contributions to the accumulators, bits number 10 and higher of each accu...