Browse Prior Art Database

Hands-free Operation of a Handset with Inlet Access through the Bottom of the Desktop Stand

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000016518D
Published in the IP.com Journal: Volume 3 Issue 7 (2003-07-25)
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jul-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

This invention describes a way of enabling hands-free operation of a mobile handset with microphone inlet holes at the bottom and/or in the back of the handset. The solution presented adds access to the microphone inlets via a gap in the base of the desktop stand. So far, in order to avoid that the direct path from the sound source to the microphone inlet is blocked when the handset is placed in the desktop stand, at least one microphone inlet had to be placed in the front of the handset (fig. 1). Though this solution is very simple and does not require any additional tuning, it is often undesirable to have an inlet hole placed in the front of the handset since this may interfere with the performance of the microphone. Also the inlets at the back and at the bottom of the handset need to stay uncovered to preserve an unidirectional characteristic.

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Hands-free Operation of a Handset with Inlet Access through the Bottom of the Desktop Stand

Idea: Rene Eske Jensen, DK-Aalborg; Clemens Boje Larsen; DK-Aalborg

This invention describes a way of enabling hands-free operation of a mobile handset with microphone inlet holes at the bottom and/or in the back of the handset. The solution presented adds access to the microphone inlets via a gap in the base of the desktop stand.

So far, in order to avoid that the direct path from the sound source to the microphone inlet is blocked when the handset is placed in the desktop stand, at least one microphone inlet had to be placed in the front of the handset (fig. 1). Though this solution is very simple and does not require any additional tuning, it is often undesirable to have an inlet hole placed in the front of the handset since this may interfere with the performance of the microphone. Also the inlets at the back and at the bottom of the handset need to stay uncovered to preserve an unidirectional characteristic.

To avoid this, the desktop stand can be elevated from the table by enlarged rubber feet so that a gap is created underneath the stand. The access to the otherwise covered inlets can then be ensured by a duct in the bottom of the stand (fig. 2). To demonstrate the feasibility of this design, a model with an unidirectional microphone has been constructed (fig. 3). Since the desktop stand is part of the acoustic system, both the handset and the stand must be tuned fo...