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Mood Rhythms

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000016740D
Publication Date: 2003-Jul-14
Document File: 1 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Suppose that a mobile phone user wants to configure the mood setting on their device to automatically change over time. The Mood Rhythm application would allow the user to set up a number of mood attributes, such as sleep, working, weekend, etc, as a simple function of time over a repeating period (e.g. a week).

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Date of Innovation: 15 November, 2001

Innovation Background

The ADS project concerning Moods describes how a user can select their mood from an available selection, and this mood is then made available for a given group of contacts. If a potential caller checks for availability of the user, they will receive the contents of the current mood profile, which contains customisable contents, possibly including availability, location, best method of contacting, a message, downloadable graphics, etc.

However, the problem is that users of mobile phones are likely to routinely forget to change their current mood, which means that the mood information is likely to be out of date and therefore unreliable. Ideally, the mood information would be automatically updated, but how can this be achieved?

There is a commonly held idea of biorhythms, which are subjective measurements of physical, emotional, intellectual, and intuitive abilities, and how these abilities vary over time (the commonly held belief is that the different attributes cycle over different periods). The idea is that the different attributes together describe your current state.

Innovation Summary

Suppose that a mobile phone user wants to configure the mood setting on their device to automatically change over time. The Mood Rhythm application would allow the user to set up a number of mood attributes, such as sleep, working, weekend, etc, as a simple function of time over a repeating period (e.g. a week).

The application wou...