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SOY BASED AEROBIC CO-METABOLISM OF CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS AND FLUOROCARBONS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000016788D
Publication Date: 2003-Jul-15
Document File: 8 page(s) / 453K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Jerome Cibrik: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

An innovative aerobic co-metabolism technique for rapid and cost effective remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and fluorocarbons in groundwater has been identified and tested at a Dow Chemical Company (DOW) facility in West Virginia. Bench scale testing was performed to refine the physical and mechanical aspects of the technique and to evaluate various products and mixtures to be used as the co-metabolite. A commercially available soy oil mixture was developed and used in a multi-step process that combines liquid/liquid extraction and co-metabolic processes to achieve rapid and highly cost effective reduction in aquifer contaminant concentrations. Two field-scale tests were performed and the results monitored over an 8-month period. Field and laboratory data collected during the monitoring period indicate that the technique has been highly effective for the removal of carbon tetrachloride and trichlorofluoromethane. Decreases of greater than 99 percent in contaminant concentrations in individual wells and site-wide decreases of greater than 90 percent have been achieved in less than 8 months.

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� SOY BASED AEROBIC CO-METABOLISM OF

CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS AND FLUOROCARBONS

 

Don Blackert, P.G. (Key Environmental, Inc., Carnegie, PA, USA

dblackert@keyenvir.com)

Jerome Cibrik, P.G. (The Dow Chemical Company, South Charleston, WV, USA )

Raymond Glenn (Key Environmental, Inc., Carnegie, PA, USA)

Bill Ayres (AG Environmental Products, Lenexa, KS, USA)

ABSTRACT

An innovative aerobic co-metabolism technique for rapid and cost effective remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and fluorocarbons in groundwater has been identified and tested at a Dow Chemical Company (DOW) facility in West Virginia.� Bench scale testing was performed to refine the physical and mechanical aspects of the technique and to evaluate various products and mixtures to be used as the co-metabolite.� A commercially available soy oil mixture was developed and used in a multi-step process that combines liquid/liquid extraction and co-metabolic processes to achieve rapid and highly cost effective reduction in aquifer contaminant concentrations.� Two field-scale tests were performed and the results monitored over an 8-month period.� Field and laboratory data collected during the monitoring period indicate that the technique has been highly effective for the removal of carbon tetrachloride and trichlorofluoromethane. Decreases of greater than 99 percent in contaminant concentrations in individual wells and site-wide decreases of greater than 90 percent have been achieved in less than 8 months.

INTRODUCTION

Decrease or elimination of chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater was observed to occur simultaneously with aerobic toluene biodegradation at a DOW remediation site in West Virginia.� � The remediation system consisted of conventional air sparging and vapor extraction (AS/VE) equipment designed to remediate toluene through the simultaneous use of volatilization and enhanced aerobic degradation.� Although the mechanism resulting in chlorinated hydrocarbon depletion during toluene degradation was not specifically studied or verified, toluene monoxygenase and/or dioxygenase enzyme co-metabolism was assumed to be the driving process.

Other areas of this facility were known to contain relatively high concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbons and fluorocarbons in groundwater.� The compounds of interest (COI) at these locations did not include toluene or other hydrocarbons at concentrations that would be readily degradable by aerobic metabolic processes.� � Several years of remediation utilizing air sparging, as well as a source area groundwater pumping effort, resulted in COI concentrations remaining at concentrations approaching 100 milligrams per liter (mg/l).� As a result, a process was developed and tested in an effort to simulate and enhance the successful aerobic co-metabolism observed at other portions of the facility.

The process described within this paper combines several proven technologies, including air sparging, liquid/liquid extraction, and biological co-metabolis...