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Method for a residential gateway in a dual-port Ethernet controller

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000016819D
Publication Date: 2003-Jul-16
Document File: 4 page(s) / 113K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a residential gateway in a dual-port Ethernet controller. Benefits include improved power performance and improved cost effectiveness.

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Method for a residential gateway in a dual-port Ethernet controller

Disclosed is a method for a residential gateway in a dual-port Ethernet controller. Benefits include improved power performance and improved cost effectiveness.

Background

              One of the most popular ways to implement Internet sharing in a home network is to have one computer act as a residential gateway connected to the Internet. All the other computers in the home network connect to the residential gateway. That computer implements network address translation (NAT) protocol and shares the Internet access between all the home network nodes (see Figure 1). Typically, home networks include two or three computers.

              The problem with this solution is that the computer that connects to the Internet by a digital subscriber line (DSL) or other connection must be “always on” to perform the Internet sharing, even if no one is using it. This situation may consume unnecessary power and result in adverse sideaffects to the implementer.

              A popular way to implement the Internet sharing is to connect two (or more) network interface cards (NICs) to the residential gateway computer. One is connected to the DSL modem and to the Internet and the other is connected to another home computer or to a hub, which connects multiple computers.

Description

              The disclosed method implements the residential gateway inside a dual port NIC.

The dual port NIC has an on die controller that inspects incoming packets on one port and may produce packets on the other port (see Figure 2). The controller stores the firmware (FW) that implements the necessary protocols to enable Internet sharing, such as NAT and a dial-up program.

              When the computer is online, it implements the necessary protocols and uses the dual port NIC as a simple d...