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Fluid Collection Systems Produced with Superabsorbent Containing Film

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000017001D
Publication Date: 2003-Jul-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

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Abstract

Fluid Collection Systems Produced with Superabsorbent Containing Film. A superabsorbent containing film is useful for liquid waste management applications include gellation of sewage sludge, river or lake bottom sludge, nuclear or radioactive liquid waste, water used during asbestos removal and medical waste or any other liquids that need to be contained or prevented from spilling. An asymmetric multilayer structure would be fabricated into a bag. The superabsorbent containing skin side of the film should be turned towards the inside of the bag. Bags covering a wide variety of sizes and other desirable attributes may be readily designed using SAP containing films and laminates.

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Fluid Collection Systems Produced with Superabsorbent Containing Film

Polymers, especially superabsorbent polymers (SAP) as a means of gelling liquid are well known for their use in personal hygiene applications and in numerous other areas. Other applications include water blocking cable, agricultural water retention, waste management and the like. Polymers used in these applications include hydrophilic cellulose ethers, polyethylene oxide, polyacrylamide and a variety of other polymers, especially lightly crosslinked, partially neutralized polyacrylates. The primary means of delivering any of these polymers, but particularly SAP, to these applications has been either in the form of fibers or as granules. (see, Buchholz and Graham, Modern Superabsorbent Polymer Technology, Wiley VCH, 1998). More recently, it has been suggested that SAP can be compounded into thermoplastic polymers. The thermoplastic superabsorbent polymer composites can then be formed by extrusion, for example, into film, sheet, laminates, foams, profiles and injection molded articles such as monolayer films, multilayer films, nonwoven webs, sheets, foams, profiles, multilayer laminates, fibers, tubes, rods or pipes. Such a material (see e.g., US20020039869A1, US 6458877, US 6534572) is useful in a wide array of applications, including liquid waste management. (In this context, “film” includes thicker structures than can be made by direct extrusion, molded or calendered sheets and the like).� Waste management applications include gellation of sewage sludge, river or lake bottom sludge, nuclear or radioactive liquid waste, water used during asbestos removal and medical waste or any other liquids that need to be contained or prevented from spilling (see e.g., EP 494599, US 5713372) (ostomy bags, urine bags, surgical waste collection bags etc.).

A SAP containing film can be a mono or multilayer structure that can be fabricated via co-extrusion,� calendering, molding, blow molding� or lamination or by using an adhesive. The film may be foamed or have a non-woven or fibrous structure, for example to improve the fluid access to the bulk of the structure and hence efficiency of the fluid absorption. Typically the multilayer structure would be asymmetric (A/B/C/SAP or A/B/C/B/SAP films, A/SAP film/B) to provide different functionality to the film such as heat or RF sealability and softness, although symmetric structures (A/SAP film/A) are possible. A SAP containing film can be fabricated into a bag. A typical bag can have, for example, its walls formed from a multilayer SAP containing film. In order to retain fluid in the closed bag, the film, with its sealable skin layers facing each other, may be sealed together along the outer periphery of the bag by a variety of well-known means. This includes heat sealing, RF-sealing, impulse sealing, etc or a tie system or other alternate closure system. The SAP containing skin side of the film should be turned towards the inside of the bag...