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Low Viscosity Skin Care Formulations Based on High Internal Phase Emulsions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000018803D
Publication Date: 2003-Aug-11
Document File: 5 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The preparation of stable, low viscosity skin care formulations containing emollient oils generally requires the use of a polymeric thickener. However, many of these thickeners are unsuitable for use in making formulations that are low enough in viscosity to be sprayed or used to manufacture wet wipes. We have developed several low viscosity skin care formulations that are based on a line of high internal phase emollient emulsions. These formulations make use of certain polymeric thickeners that are particulalry suited for this purpose.

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Dow Corning Corporation has recently introduced a series of High Internal Phase (HIP) emulsions.  The emulsions contain a variety of different silicone and non-silicone emollients (see Table 1).  These new products are oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions that are designed to facilitate the rapid development of skin care and antiperspirant/deodorant formulations that contain these emollients.  A formulation can be made by simply diluting the HIP emulsion (or combination of HIP emulsions) into water that contains a thickener to give the desired consistency.  Adding a preservative and fragrance completes the formulation development process.  The problems associated with achieving a stable emulsion of the emollient(s) are avoided and the formulator can focus on fine-tuning the esthetics of the formula.  Formulations based on HIP emulsions can be made in very simple mixing equipment since no high shear mixing devices are needed to perform the emulsification step.

Another advantage of pre-emulsified emollients is that the formulator can simply add them to an existing formulation to modify its esthetics without having to worry about accommodating the new emollient(s) into the existing emulsification system.  This can save a lot of time and it allows easy incorporation of emollients such as silicone elastomers that can otherwise present a significant emulsification challenge.

Table 1: High Internal Phase (HIP) Emulsion Product Composition

Product

Emollient / Fluid

% Active

Surfactant Package

Dow Corning® 7-3099 Dimethicone HIP Emulsion

 

Dimethicone

(100 cSt)

80 %

Ceteth-10

Laureth-4

 

Dow Corning® 7-3100 Gum Blend HIP Emulsion

Cyclopentasiloxane (and) Dimethiconol

84 %

Laureth-4

Laureth-23

Dow Corning® 7-3101 Elastomer Blend HIP Emulsion

Cyclopentasiloxane (and) Dimethicone Crosspolymer (and) Dimethicone

85 %

Laureth-4

Laureth-23

Dow Corning® 7-3105 Petrolatum HIP Emulsion

Petrolatum

81 %

Ceteth-10

Steareth-21

Poloxamer 335

 

Dow Corning® 7-3111 Petrolatum Blend HIP Emulsion

Petrolatum (and) Dimethicone

77 %

Ceteth-10

Steareth-21

Poloxamer 335

Dow Corning® 7-3110 Volatile Fluid HIP Emulsion

Dimethicone (and) Trisiloxane

80 %

Ceteth-10

Laureth-4

The new HIP emulsions generally have a droplet size that is quite small, typically less than two microns.  This feature makes them well suited for low viscosity formulations where creaming can be a problem.  Creaming is the term used to refer to a phenomenon whereby the droplets of emollient move under the influence of gravity to either the top or the bottom of the formulation.  Typically the droplets of emollient are less dense than the aqueous portion of the formulation, so they tend to float to the top.  Creaming is undesirable because it produces a non-uniform product.  The rate of movement in liquid formulation can be reduced by reducing the droplet size of the oil, or by thickening the formulation to retard movement of the droplets through the formulation.  Thickening agents that are useful for reducing creami...