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Soft and hard panel control button behavioral specification for augmented feedback

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000018828D
Publication Date: 2003-Aug-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Currently there is no solution that integrates two-stage tactile (force) feedback from buttons on both hard and soft panels for the same machine.

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Soft and hard panel control button behavioral specification for augmented feedback

Currently there is no solution that integrates two-stage tactile (force) feedback from buttons on both hard and soft panels for the same machine.

ATM machines use Braille to identify some buttons. Sometimes shape, color and size are used to indicate the function of buttons. Many cameras use two-state shutter buttons that use a half-press to focus and a full press to take a picture.

Soft panel buttons in software applications are sometimes programmed to give visual feedback to identify buttons when a mouse pointer rolls over them. They are sometimes programmed to use sound when a pointer rolls over them or when they are selected.

Logitech and other companies design computer mice that provide tactile feedback when the mouse pointer moves over select parts of an image on a computer screen.

Control panel buttons, be they the kind a person presses or the kind that are in a software application and that are clicked with a mouse, do not give tactile force feedback that describes either their function or whether the button press was successful in initiating the function. The proposal here suggests a common behavioral specification for control panel presses and mouse button presses. It specifies that buttons have two states during a button press--a half-press produces a tactile signal that reveals the function of the button.  A full press creates a tactile signal that reveals whether the function was activated or whether the machine is not in a ready state to complete the function.

This invention requires the following:

1.      Buttons on control panels and PC mice that possess a half-press state and a full press state.

2.      Buttons on control panels and PC mice that have the capability to provide tactile feedback (force feedback). 

3.      The half-press state for these buttons will provide tactile information that identifies the function of a button.

4.      The full press state provides tactile information about whether the machine is able to activate the function.

5.      Feedback will be the same from the buttons on a machine’s operator...