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Command Line Interface for HTML & XML Web Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000018829D
Publication Date: 2003-Aug-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Customers are increasingly migrating from client applications that must be installed on each workstation to server-based web applications accessed via intranets and the Internet. This migration supports goals of reducing software support costs and providing access by an authorized user to any function from any workstation, including remote dial-in. A command line form is embedded in each page of the web application or presented in a second browser window. A trained user enters a command string in a text entry field and clicks the form's Submit button. The client web browser submits the form's text string to the web server. At the web server, the command is parsed and executed. The web server then uploads an updated web page to the client workstation with feedback on the command execution. Feedback on command execution can be communicated graphically in the updated web page or by a simple text string in the area of the command line form.

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Command Line Interface for HTML & XML Web Applications

Customers are increasingly migrating from client applications that must be installed on each workstation to server-based web applications accessed via intranets and the Internet. This migration supports goals of reducing software support costs and providing access by an authorized user to any function from any workstation, including remote dial-in.

Unfortunately, current web applications are unacceptably slow and require traversal of too many screens for efficient performance of production tasks.�

At one time Java was seen as the solution to these problems.� An applet downloaded to the computer of the end user can provide a fully functional client application.� However, the large Java applets required to support real tasks take unacceptably long to download and require prior installation of a compatible Java virtual machine on the workstation.

A command line form is embedded in each page of the web application or presented in a second browser window. A trained user enters a command string in a text entry field and clicks the form's Submit button.� The client web browser submits the form's text string to the web server.� � At the web server, the command is parsed and executed.� The web server then uploads an updated web page to the client workstation with feedback on the command execution.

Feedback on command execution can be communicated graphically in the updated web page or by a simple text string in the area of the command line form.

The concept is related to the command line interfaces that were the dominant paradigm in computing twenty years ago.� Command line interfaces were more difficult to learn but, once learned, provided outstanding user productivity with minimal bandwidth requirements.

The limitations of HTML and even XML often mean that several screens must be traversed for even simple transactions.� And, even with the broadband access of a corporate LAN, web pages with modest graphics can take 5-10 seconds to download and display.� Thus, a simple transaction that would have taken a few seconds with a client application can take minutes to complete with a web-based application.�...