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Goals for IPv6 Site-Multihoming Architectures (RFC3582)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000018889D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Aug-20
Document File: 10 page(s) / 17K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. Abley: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This document outlines a set of goals for proposed new IPv6 site- multihoming architectures. It is recognised that this set of goals is ambitious and that some goals may conflict with others. The solution or solutions adopted may only be able to satisfy some of the goals presented here.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 21% of the total text.

Network Working Group J. Abley

Request for Comments: 3582 ISC

Category: Informational B. Black

Layer8 Networks

V. Gill

AOL Time Warner

August 2003

Goals for IPv6 Site-Multihoming Architectures

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does

not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this

memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2003). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

This document outlines a set of goals for proposed new IPv6 site-

multihoming architectures. It is recognised that this set of goals

is ambitious and that some goals may conflict with others. The

solution or solutions adopted may only be able to satisfy some of the

goals presented here.

1. Introduction

Site-multihoming, i.e., connecting to more than one IP service

provider, is an essential component of service for many sites which

are part of the Internet.

Current IPv4 site-multihoming practices have been added on to the

CIDR architecture [1], which assumes that routing table entries can

be aggregated based upon a hierarchy of customers and service

providers.

However, it appears that this hierarchy is being supplanted by a

dense mesh of interconnections [6]. Additionally, there has been an

enormous growth in the number of multihomed sites. For purposes of

redundancy and load-sharing, the multihomed address blocks are

introduced into the global table even if they are covered by a

provider aggregate. This contributes to the rapidly-increasing size

of both the global routing table and the turbulence exhibited within

it, and places stress on the inter-provider routing system.

Abley, et al. Informational [Page 1]

RFC 3582 IPv6 Site-Multihoming Goals August 2003

Continued growth of both the Internet and the practice of site-

multihoming will seriously exacerbate this stress. The site-

multihoming architecture for IPv6 should allow the routing system to

scale more pleasantly.

2. Terminology

A "site" is an entity autonomously operating a network using IP, and

in particular, determining the addressing plan and routing policy for

that network. This definition is intended to be equivalent to

"enterprise" as defined in [2].

A "transit provider" operates a site that directly provides

connectivity to the Internet to one or more external sites. The

connectivity provided extends beyond the transit provider's own site.

A transit provider's site is directly connected to the sites for

which it provides transit.

A "multihomed" site is one with more than one transit provider.

"Site-multihoming" is the practice of arranging a site to be

multihomed.

The term "re-homing" denotes a transition of a site between two

states of connectedness due to a change in the connectivity between

the site and its transit providers' sites.

3. Multihoming Goals

3.1. Capabilities of IPv4 Multihoming

The following capabilities of current IPv4 multihoming practices

should be supported by an IPv6 multihoming architecture.

3.1.1. Redundancy

B...