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Magnetic mask for topological difficult geometries

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019193D
Publication Date: 2003-Sep-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 83K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A fast way of patterning films with metal through physical deposition (thermal vapor deposition, sputtering, e-beam deposition etc.) is to use rigid masks. The masks have to be thin and close to the surface to avoid shadow effects. This can be particular difficult with topological difficult geometries such as a ring. This invention proposes a magnetic mask that does not require clamps to hold it down; hence, avoids all detrimental effects of shadows and unwanted depositions (e.g., unwanted deposition under the mask if it is not tightly fit to the surface).

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Magnetic mask for topological difficult geometries

A fast way of patterning films with metal through physical deposition (thermal vapor deposition, sputtering, e-beam deposition etc.) is to use rigid masks. The masks have to be thin and close to the surface to avoid shadow effects. This can be particular difficult with topological difficult geometries such as a ring.

This invention proposes a magnetic mask that does not require clamps to hold it down; hence, avoids all detrimental effects of shadows and unwanted depositions (e.g., unwanted deposition under the mask if it is not tightly fit to the surface).

Resistance measurements (volume, sheet, or surface) of insulating materials often run into the problem of good contacts. This problem can be avoided, in part, by using point probes (e.g., a four-point probe); however, one may run into problems of unacceptable high and/or unstable voltages if the probes are reasonably spaced.

Other methods require contacts that are extended over a finite surface area; hence, good contact at every point is critical. This can be achieved by using mercury contacts; however, it is not a preferable metal to work with because of the obvious health hazards. The next best thing is to apply metal contacts with some kind of physical deposition.

Simple patterns such as dots pose no problem; since the masks that are used can be clamped down tightly to avoid any shadow effects or unwanted depositions underneath the mask.

On the other hand other patterns such as an uncoated ring in an otherwise fully coated surface as shown in Figure 1...