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Utilization of Methanation catalyst as a replacement for conventional Palladium based "De-oxo" catalysts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019384D
Publication Date: 2003-Sep-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

It was found that, under certain conditions, conventional NiO methanation catalyst would completely remove small traces of oxygen from hydrogen-rich gas streams through the reaction of hydrogen and oxygen combining to produce water. The advantage of using this catalyst rather than the traditional Palladium-based "de-oxo" catalyst is that the methanation catalyst is significantly less expensive and is much less sensitive to poisoning from trace impurities in the gas stream.

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Utilization of Methanation catalyst as a replacement for

conventional Palladium based “De-oxo” catalysts

It was found that, under certain conditions, conventional NiO methanation catalyst would completely remove small traces of oxygen from hydrogen-rich gas streams through the reaction of hydrogen and oxygen combining to produce water. The advantage of using this catalyst rather than the traditional Palladium-based “de-oxo” catalyst is that the methanation catalyst is significantly less expensive and is much less sensitive to poisoning from trace impurities in the gas stream.

This phenomenon was first observed in a facility producing hydrogen (purities in excess of 99.9% by volume) from a chlor-alkali facility off-gas where the oxygen levels in the hydrogen product continued to be significantly below the feed concentration after the Palladium-based “de-oxo” catalyst was severely poisoned and showed no reactivity. Additional plant testing confirmed that the NiO methanation catalyst bed downstream of the “de-oxo” catalyst bed was catalyzing the hydrogen/oxygen reaction to remove the oxygen. Subsequent lab testing confirmed this phenomenon.

These lab tests showed that, at oxygen feed levels of 2665 ppm and pressures ranging from atmospheric to 250 psig, NiO catalyst showed the capability to reduce oxygen levels to below detectable levels. Feed temperatures were between 500 and 650 degrees F. The tests were run for 4 hours and showed no decline in activity of the catalyst.

It is theorized that the NiO can catalyze the desired reaction via the Ni meta...