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Method of Closing Residual Porosity in Assembled Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Devices Using Suspensions of Nanocrystalline Particles

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019412D
Publication Date: 2003-Sep-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Commercial ceramic-based ion transport membrane (ITM) devices require the fabrication of a supported thin-film ITM layer of approximately (50 (m to achieve the required economic oxygen flux for commercial application such as IGCC, gasification, syngas processing, hydrogen generation, or medical oxygen production. Commercially viable configurations for ITM devices include tubular, planar, or monolith structures. A plurality of methods has been proposed to fabricate the thin film ITM layer on the support layer(s), for example, by conventional ceramic processing techniques including tape casting or calendaring, followed by lamination, pressing, and firing, chemical vapor deposition or infiltration on or within a support layer, or extrusion or co-extrusion.

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Method of Closing Residual Porosity in Assembled Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Devices Using Suspensions of Nanocrystalline Particles

Commercial ceramic-based ion transport membrane (ITM) devices require the fabrication of a supported thin-film ITM layer of approximately <50 mm to achieve the required economic oxygen flux for commercial application such as IGCC, gasification, syngas processing, hydrogen generation, or medical oxygen production. Commercially viable configurations for ITM devices include tubular, planar, or monolith structures. A plurality of methods has been proposed to fabricate the thin film ITM layer on the support layer(s), for example, by conventional ceramic processing techniques including tape casting or calendaring, followed by lamination, pressing, and firing, chemical vapor deposition or infiltration on or within a support layer, or extrusion or co-extrusion.

Avoiding open porosity voids is a major challenge in the fabrication of such thin ITM layers over the large membrane areas required for industrial applications. For example, the thin separation layer may be constrained by the porous support while attempts are made to sinter the layer to full density, or foreign bodies such as dust particles or organic rich regions are possible causes of open porosity in the separation layer after the ceramic ITM device is fired and sintered. Dust particles are particularly problematic, as they could give rise to individual, isolated but large open pores in the membrane separation layer on the order of 10's microns in diameter. Theoretical calculations of the effect of residual porosity in the dense ITM separation layer demonstrate the catastrophic effect of large pores on the projected product integrity (for example, oxygen purity) from an ITM device.

This idea proposes that remnant porosity could be sealed or reduced to acceptable levels by filtering a suspension of nanocrystalline particles into remnant open porosity voids in the fired and sintered ITM separation layer. A suspension of s...