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Integration of ITM Oxygen Generator with Syngas Production

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019422D
Publication Date: 2003-Sep-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

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Abstract

Oxygen can be recovered from air at high temperatures by passing hot, compressed, oxygen-containing gas, preferably air, over non-porous, mixed-conducting ceramic membranes. These membranes, known in the art generically as ion transport membranes (ITM), utilize an oxygen partial pressure differential across the membrane to cause oxygen ions to migrate through the membrane. In addition to conducting the oxygen ions, these mixed-conductors allow electrons to move in the opposite direction for the formation of the oxygen ions on the feed side and oxygen molecules on the permeate side of the membrane. Membranes can be fabricated as tubes or flat plates that are arranged in modules for efficient contacting with hot compressed air. High-purity oxygen permeate and nitrogen-enriched non-permeate products are withdrawn from the modules. A class of ITM membranes that are not mixed-conducting materials can also be used in this application. In these cases, the oxygen ions are driven through the membrane by applying an external voltage potential to the membrane. A comprehensive review of ion transport membranes is given by J. D. Wright and R. J. Copeland in Report No. TDA-GRI-90/0303 prepared for the Gas Research Institute, September 1990.

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Integration of ITM Oxygen Generator with Syngas Production

Oxygen can be recovered from air at high temperatures by passing hot, compressed,
oxygen-containing gas, preferably air, over non-porous, mixed-conducting ceramic membranes. These membranes, known in the art generically as ion transport membranes (ITM), utilize an oxygen partial pressure differential across the membrane to cause oxygen ions to migrate through the membrane. In addition to conducting the oxygen ions, these mixed-conductors allow electrons to move in the opposite direction for the formation of the oxygen ions on the feed side and oxygen molecules on the permeate side of the membrane. Membranes can be fabricated as tubes or flat plates that are arranged in modules for efficient contacting with hot compressed air. High-purity oxygen permeate and nitrogen-enriched non-permeate products are withdrawn from the modules. A class of ITM membranes that are not mixed-conducting materials can also be used in this application. In these cases, the oxygen ions are driven through the membrane by applying an external voltage potential to the membrane. A comprehensive review of ion transport membranes is given by J. D. Wright and R. J. Copeland in Report No. TDA-GRI-90/0303 prepared for the Gas Research Institute, September 1990.

Production of oxygen using ion transport membrane (ITM) requires feed air temperatures in the range of 700-1100°C. Integration of the ITM with gas turbines has been proposed. Such integrations are disclosed in EP0658366B1 and EP0658367B1. The high pressure non-permeate stream can be expanded in a gas turbine to generate mechanical work. A portion of this mechanical work can be used to drive the compressor supplying air to the ITM. Since oxygen produced by ITM for process applications typically requires booster compression, the gas turbine can be used to generate at least a part of the power consumed by this compressor. Some additional power may be available for export to the customer's process or to a grid.

When the ITM oxygen is produced for a hydrocarbon conversion cycle, the heat energy retained by both the high purity oxygen product (permeate) a...