Browse Prior Art Database

Use of Solids Dispersants to Enhance Catalyst Loading in Slurry Phase Reactors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019434D
Publication Date: 2003-Sep-12
Document File: 3 page(s) / 123K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This disclosure relates to a method to increase the loading of catalyst in slurry phase reactors, including slurry bubble column reactors, slurry phase continuous stirred tank reactors, three-phase fluidized bed reactors, and any other types of reactors that use catalyst slurry. The increase in catalyst loading is achieved by introducing solids dispersants or surfactants into the catalyst slurry. The increase in catalyst loading will result in greater reactor volumetric productivity of the reactor, therefore, decreasing the size of the reactor. This in turn leads to smaller capital investment and less difficulties in reactor manufacturing, shipment and installation.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 33% of the total text.

Use of Solids Dispersants to Enhance Catalyst Loading in Slurry Phase Reactors

This disclosure relates to a method to increase the loading of catalyst in slurry phase reactors, including slurry bubble column reactors, slurry phase continuous stirred tank reactors, three-phase fluidized bed reactors, and any other types of reactors that use catalyst slurry. The increase in catalyst loading is achieved by introducing solids dispersants or surfactants into the catalyst slurry. The increase in catalyst loading will result in greater reactor volumetric productivity of the reactor, therefore, decreasing the size of the reactor. This in turn leads to smaller capital investment and less difficulties in reactor manufacturing, shipment and installation.

This method is especially suited for slurry phase reactors used for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid fuels or chemicals (e.g., methanol, dimethyl ether (DME) and hydrocarbons (Fischer-Tropsch products)). Slurry phase reactors provide superior heat transfer and temperature management for highly exothermic syngas conversion reactions, resulting in good catalyst activity maintenance and product selectivity control. The volume of bubble column reactors for syngas conversion is usually very largedue to the lower catalyst density compared to fixed bed, and the required high throughput of the syngas conversion process. This leads to high capital cost and engineering difficulties associated with large reactor vessels. These difficulties can be mitigated using high reactor catalyst loading. High catalyst loading means smaller slurry volume for a given amount of catalyst, greater volumetric productivity of the reactor, therefore, a smaller reactor for a given production.

This method also applies to slurry phase reactors made of high cost materials due to pressure, temperature and corrosion concerns. It can also be used to increase the production of an existing reactor (i.e., debottleneck) by expanding its catalyst loading limits.

Increasing volumetric productivity of slurry phase reactors by increasing catalyst loading is normally face various problems. Higher catalyst loadings generally result in increased apparent slurry viscosity, lower gas holdup and a smaller mass transfer coefficient. The thickness associated with high catalyst loading may pose problems in slurry handling, such as charging or discharging the slurry in and out of a reactor. Furthermore, at vary high catalyst loadings, the catalyst particles are more prone to agglomerate, settle and foul the internals of the reactor, causing unstable operation.

Due to the afore-mentioned problems, the catalyst loading in a bubble column reactor has a practical limit, determined by the properties of catalyst powders (e.g., skeletal density, pore volume, and surface properties), the properties of the slurry fluid (e.g., density, viscosity and surface properties) and operating conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure and gas velocity). This limit sets the u...