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Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Robust Error Injection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019527D
Publication Date: 2003-Sep-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 224K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that injects a single error, or a clump of errors, into a system to validate performance, error handling routines, and error recovery mechanisms. Benefits include a simplified, cost-effective process.

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Method for Robust Error Injection

Disclosed is a method that injects a single error, or a clump of errors, into a system to validate performance, error handling routines, and error recovery mechanisms. Benefits include a simplified, cost-effective process.

Background

Currently, errors are injected externally, but are limited to only limited types of errors. Parallel type busses make error injection easier, but with the shift to high-speed serial busses, error injection becomes more difficult and costly.

A second common error validation method involves the use of “error generator” software, which must run on a processor and periodically generate system errors by programming special diagnostic modes that have been provided by the system hardware. This software interferes with other software that is running on the system, making it literally impossible to validate the effect of system errors during the course of normal user workloads.

General Description

The disclosed method contains the following components (see Figure 1):

§         a configurable counter

§         control logic (for event selection)

§         a counter control

§         mode control (for specific error types)

The multiplexor in front of the counter is used to select the system events which will be used to start, increment, decrement, stop and/or reset the counter. These events are immediate or later in time. The counter is placed into various modes (see Figure 2). In a one-shot mode, the counter counts for a duration of time, and then stops. In a periodic mode, the counter counts continually. The output from the counter is a pulse which happens only once, or in periodic mode, happens on a recurring basis. The mode register determines how the counter output is treated. The error signal bas...