Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Client-Side Address Resolution

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019619D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Sep-23
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Sep-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

An idea to help new users of web browsers when unable to find pages they are looking for. Book marked pages in a web browser can become old and unusable over a period of time as the pages they point to change under the static link. The same is true for other examples such as search engines when having not crawled a server recently. The result is a bad link that will give rise to a "page not found" type error in the browser that could prematurely end the browsing experience.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Client-Side Address Resolution

Disclosed is an idea to help new users of web browsers when unable to find pages they are looking for. Book marked pages in a web browser can become old and unusable over a period of time as the pages they point to change under the static link. The same is true for other examples such as search engines when having not crawled a server recently. The result is a bad link that will give rise to a "page not found" type error in the browser that could prematurely end the browsing experience.

    An experienced web user would be able to make some guesses at what the new address should be, this is not the case for a user who is not familiar with web addresses and how they are organised. The typical client-side solution at present is this manual intervention where the user will have to make their own guesses as to the new address of a web page. This is time consuming and not suitable for all web users as described.

Example problems:
1) A specific page (my-page.html) is book marked to a particular website (www.my-example.com). Whenever the book mark is used, the web browser will automatically display the page at http://www.my-example.com/my-page.html. Take the case where the book mark has been on a user's browser for some time and the website administrators move my-page.html somewhere else on their server, for example my-page2.html. In this case, when the user goes back to use the book mark the user will get a "page not found" error because the page has been moved to a different location.
2) A search engine has been used to find a specific page my-page.html) on a website (www.my-example.com). When the search results are used in a browser, the user will be directed to the page at http://www.my-example.com/my-page.html. Again, some period of time later, the page may have moved but the search engine not updated so the same link will give a "page not found" error.

    For the experienced web user, they may be able to make guesses as to where the page has been moved to, or go to the nearest index page. In example (1) the user may not be expected to know of a page name-change, however, they could go to the index page at http://www.my-example.com and continue browsing from there. This is not the case for web users that do not know how to manipulate web addresses in their browser. In this case, there is disclosed the idea of making some intelligent guesses via the user's browser as to where the page has been moved to and if the user is unable to find the page then move to the nearest index on that server. This could be done via a button on the user's browser.

    The disclosed implementation uses heuristics to determine a new web address given a page that no longer exists for a particular server. The best way to determine the heuristics and their ordering is to watch various experienced browser users look for pages that have moved from the ones they have been given. A suggested heuristic is shown below u...