Browse Prior Art Database

Blade Secure Distributed Storage Servers On Demand

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019779D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Sep-29
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Sep-29
Document File: 3 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

The basic problem is that there exists no easy, affordable, accessible, and automatic process by which computing devices owned by individuals (eg. at home or in a small-business environment) or by companies with an intranet infrastructure (eg. IBM), can be completely or partially backed up. Users of computing device want a quick and easy solution to the old question "Where can I copy this data so that I can retrieve it later should my computer/device die?". The answer lies in a new e-business model outlined by this disclosure.

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Blade Secure Distributed Storage Servers On Demand

      Consider any computing device which has the ability to store information (eg. desktop computer w/ hard drive, hand-held device like a Palm Pilot, etc.). In most cases, there is a requirement or a practical need in backing up the data (or part thereof) stored on such devices. This can be achieved via secondary devices (eg. ZIP drives, CD-ROMs), or in a networked environment (eg. private company), via dedicated storage servers. Both can be non - practical and expensive. A company which requires its employees to backup all of their data would typically install 3rd party software on client machines (to be backed up) and configure the software to periodically copy specific data to pre-configured storage servers. A company which does not provide its employees with automated backup mechanisms more or less leaves that responsibility in the hands of their employee (i.e. you figure it out).

    The basic problem is that there exists no easy, affordable, accessible, and automatic process by which computing devices owned by individuals (eg. at home or in a small-business environment) or by companies with an intranet infrastructure (eg. IBM), can be completely or partially backed up. Users of computing device want a quick and easy solution to the old question "Where can I copy this data so that I can retrieve it later should my computer/device die?". The answer lies in a new e-business model outlined by this disclosure.

    We propose an internet (or intranet) based solution which provides any user with immediate access to what we call Secure Distributed Storage Servers (SDSSs). These SDSSs can in fact be viewed as IT utilities. Based on the model being implemented, these SDSSs are either public utilities distributed across the internet or private utilities distributed with a company's intranet. Clients (i.e. devices that require backup services) connect to a Storage Agent (SA). The Storage Agent is the sole interface to the SDSSs. In fact, clients know nothing about the existence of SDSSs. Clients deal strictly with the SA, who acts as a broker in the transaction. The SA can either be accessed by the client via a website (within an intranet for the private utility model, or a globally accessible website for the public model). It might also be feasible to imbed the SA directly in the browser (eg. Microsoft Explorer). This would provide the browser with a competitive advantage. Instead of going to a website to start a backup transaction, a user could simply click on a new browser icon which would initiate the backup transaction.

    We propose an internet (or intranet) based solution which provides any user with immediate access to what we call Secure Distributed Storage Servers (SDSSs). These SDSSs can in fact be viewed as IT utilities. Based on the model being implemented, these SDSSs are either public utilities distributed across the internet or private utilities distributed with a company's intranet. C...