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Browse Prior Art Database

Autonomic Timezone Setting Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019792D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Sep-29
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Sep-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

This invention autonomically uses information broadcast by 802.11 Wireless LAN Access Points to determine a change in the local time. An algorithm would determine the likely timezone based on the time difference between the computer's set time and the time set on the access point. The user would be presented with a user interface to confirm the change and have the setting updated on their computer.

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Autonomic Timezone Setting Control

Today, when mobile computers are moved from one time zone to another, the user must manually specify to the operating system which timezone he or she has moved to. One solution to this problem is to connect to a domain controller. The server will then update the client's clock. There are two main drawbacks to this: 1) It will not set the timezone; 2) Many traveling computer users do not sign into a domain when they are away. As the number of mobile users increases, more and more people will be faced with the problem of manually setting their timezone setting in the operating system to maintain correct local time.

This invention autonomically uses information broadcast by 802.11 Wireless LAN Access Points to determine a change in the local time. An algorithm would determine the likely timezone based on the time difference between the computer's set time and the time set on the access point. The user would be presented with a user interface to confirm the change and have the setting updated on their computer.

This invention takes advantage of the proliferation of 802.11 Wireless LANs; not only in corporations, but also in public locations called hotspots (such as airports, hotels, coffee shops, etc.). Most mobile computers are either shipped with or can accommodate a wireless network adapter. The 802.11 standards describe a beacon frame that is transmitted very frequently by access points. This beacon frame allows stations to identify the availability of access points. One piece of information included in the beacon frame is a timestamp for the cur...