Browse Prior Art Database

Method for thermal management assembly for multiple devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019850D
Publication Date: 2003-Oct-01
Document File: 3 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a thermal management assembly for multiple devices. Benefits include improved functionality, improved performance, and improved cost effectiveness.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Method for thermal management assembly for multiple devices

Disclosed is a method for a thermal management assembly for multiple devices. Benefits include improved functionality, improved performance, and improved cost effectiveness.

Background

         One conventional method for simultaneously cooling multiple components is to use a single heatsink to cover all the components and place thermal interface material (TIM) between the heatsink and the components. The TIM is required to ensure a low resistance thermal path between the components and the heatsink. The TIM may be an electrical insulator to prevent the components from shorting to each other through the heatsink. The TIM must be thick enough to compensate for differences in the height and flatness of each of the components to be cooled. One disadvantage of this method is that the thermal resistance between a component and the heatsink may be large due to the thickness required of the TIM. A second disadvantage is that the choice of materials is limited because the TIM must be mechanically compressive, a good thermal conductor and may be required to be a good electrical insulator.

         AN efficient TIM (phase change) will be about 5 mils thick and introduce about 0.1’C/W on a TO-252 package. A thicker TIM (10 – 20 mils) is required to compensate for multiple components. It will introduce about 2’C/W of thermal resistance. This difference causes a significant temperature rise for parts dissipating more than a few watts (see Figure 2).

         A second method to simultaneously cool multiple components is to use a heatsink for each component, which are each individually attached to the circuit board. This solution has the advantage that the thermal resistance between each heatsink and its associated component is kept low. The components are electrically isolated. Some disadvantages of this method are the assembly cost and board area required to individually attach each heatsink (see Figure 1).

General description

The disclosed method is a thermal management assembly for simultaneously cooling multiple components, such as surface mounted field-effect transistors (FETs) in a DC/DC converter. The method is comprised of the following e...