Browse Prior Art Database

A method and system for switchable cursors in a database

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019864D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Oct-02
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Oct-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

The quickest access to information stored in a database is needed. The advantage of the invention is that two types of cursors are used to gain access to the information and which cursor gets the information first is the cursor which presents the information to the requester.

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A method and system for switchable cursors in a database

    An application server receives requests to retrieve information that will be displayed by a GUI (Graphical User Interface). When the application receives the request, the request is identified by an id which has a timestamp so that it is unique within the system. After this, two processes are started and given this id within a data structure with two additional fields. The two additional fields are used to indicate whether a process 1 has completed or a process 2 has completed. The process which completes first is the one which returns the information to the requester.

Process 1 uses a non-scrollable cursor to first obtain the count of the number of records which will be in the result set of the query. After obtaining the count, Process 1 checks whether Process 2 has completed. If it has, then Process 1 closes the non-scrollable cursor and ends. The master process which caused the two processes to start removes the data structure from memory. If Process 2 has not completed, then Process 1 executes the query to retrieve the information.

Once the query completes, Process 1 checks whether Process 2 has completed. If it has, then Process 1 closes the non-scrollable cursor and ends and the master process which caused the two processes to start removes the data structure from memory. If Process 2 has not completed, then Process 1 moves linearly to the row which corresponds to the first row the requester wants to see. Before sending the information, Process 1 again checks whether Process 2 has completed. If it has, then Process 1 closes the non-scrollable cursor and ends and the master process which caused the two processes to start removes the data structure from memory. If it has not, then Process 1 marks in the data structure that it has completed and then sends all the information to the requester. Once this has completed, Process 1...