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High-bulk Tissue Laminates for Building Materials and Other Purposes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019880D
Publication Date: 2003-Oct-06
Document File: 12 page(s) / 2M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Jeffrey D. Lindsay: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A wide variety of novel uncreped tissue products have been developed in recent years at Kimberly-Clark Corporation. In the past, it was generally believed that creping was needed to produce high-bulk tissue, but creping introduced many limitations. Advances in through-drying technology combined with other operations in novel ways have allowed soft, high bulk tissue to be made without the need to crepe the web. By eliminating the physical and chemical restraints imposed by creping, uncreped through-air dried (UCTAD) tissue has provided new possibilities in the degree of texture, bulk, resiliency, and other properties that can be achieved. Some forms of UCTAD tissue are suitable for creating thick structures with bulk and rigidity laminating to form high bulk multi-ply structures that can be used for many purposes previously outside the scope of conventional tissue. For example, multiple layers of uncreped tissue can be laminated together and optionally coated or impregnated to create board-like materials suitable as a lightweight construction material, thermal insulating material, sound proofing material, customized wall contouring, absorbent ground panels, and so forth.

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High-bulk Tissue Laminates for Building
Materials and Other Purposes

Jeffrey D. Lindsay, Fung-Jou Chen, and Julie Bednarz

Kimberly-Clark Corporation

Neenah, Wisconsin

Introduction

A wide variety of novel uncreped tissue products have been developed in recent years at Kimberly-Clark Corporation. In the past, it was generally believed that creping was needed to produce high-bulk tissue, but creping introduced many limitations. Advances in through-drying technology combined with other operations in novel ways have allowed soft, high bulk tissue to be made without the need to crepe the web. By eliminating the physical and chemical restraints imposed by creping, uncreped through-air dried (UCTAD) tissue has provided new possibilities in the degree of texture, bulk, resiliency, and other properties that can be achieved. Some forms of UCTAD tissue are suitable for creating thick structures with bulk and rigidity laminating to form high bulk multi-ply structures that can be used for many purposes previously outside the scope of conventional tissue. For example, multiple layers of uncreped tissue can be laminated together and optionally coated or impregnated to create board-like materials suitable as a lightweight construction material, thermal insulating material, sound proofing material, customized wall contouring, absorbent ground panels, and so forth.

In this paper, we discuss the physics and properties of UCTAD tissue compared to conventional creped tissue, and disclose how laminated multi-ply structures of UCTAD tissue can be used for building materials. We also note that some other forms of tissue can also be used to make related products.

Physics of Uncreped and Creped Tissue

Paper towel and other tissue products made with creping has long been limited in terms of the bulk and mechanical properties that can be achieved. This is partly because the creped tissue web must first be dried in a flat, densified state. In creping, a wet, embryonic tissue web is pressed into a flat, dense, moist state onto a large heated drum known as a Yankee dryer, the surface of which is continuously sprayed with a solution of chemicals containing adhesive compounds and often one or more release agents, as shown in Figure 1. The tissue dries rapidly from conductive heat transfer from the drum and from convective drying due to hot air impinging on the exposed side of the tissue. As the tissue dries, hydrogen bonds form between the fibers, creating a bond-defined web morphology that is flat and dense.

Figure 1. Tissue web being dried and creped on a Yankee dryer.

The creped web can be soft and bulky, but when the web is wetted, the cellulose fibers swell and straighten out, relaxing the stresses in the fibers and partially returning the morphology of the web to its bond-defined state prior to creping, which was flat and thin. This is depicted in Figure 2, which schematically depicts the structure of a group of fibers on a Yankee dryer before creping, after creping, an...