Browse Prior Art Database

The Historical Use of Information from Incontinent Persons and Their Caregivers Regarding Quality of Life and Product Selection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019950D
Publication Date: 2003-Oct-13

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Jeffrey D. Lindsay: AUTHOR [+2]

Related Documents

6359D: IP.COM

Abstract

In spite of many past advances in dealing with the incontinent and the burdens incontinence poses for patients and caregivers alike, there remains much confusion about past progress in these areas. A particular area of confusion deals with the use of information obtained from incontinent persons to help them in the selection of suitable articles. The burgeoning popularity of the Internet as an e-commerce tool, for example, has led some enthusiasts to think that computer-assisted techniques for obtaining and using information for product selection must be a recent phenomenon, but such is not the case. We have previously documented the significant role of computer-based tools for the marketing of products and the associated gathering of marketing research data (J. Lindsay et al., "The Historic Use of Computerized Tools for Marketing and Market Research," published as Document 6359D at IP.com, Dec. 27, 2001 (archived at http://search.ip.com/publication_viewer.jsp?pubID=IPCOM000006359D for those with user accounts and more conveniently available at http://www.geocities.com/marketguy555/ or http://www.jefflindsay.com/market-research.shtml). Here we provide additional historic information regarding the role of obtaining information from patients and caregivers about incontinence, with and without computer assistance, both for assessing the quality of life and also for selecting suitable incontinent devices.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 3% of the total text.

The Historical Use of Information from Incontinent Persons and Their Caregivers Regarding Quality of Life and Product Selection

Jeff Lindsay and Jennifer Marvin

Kimberly-Clark Corporation

Neenah, Wisconsin

Sept. 22, 2003

Table of Contents

Introduction. 1

Dealing with Incontinence and the Quality of Life. 2

Metrics for Assessing the Quality of Life of Caregivers and Patients. 6

Providing Guidance on Article Selection to Incontinent Persons. 14

Computerized Tools and the Internet for Product Selection. 16

Summary. 22

Appendix: Additional Publications to Consider. 23

Introduction

In spite of many past advances in dealing with the incontinent and the burdens incontinence poses for patients and caregivers alike, there remains much confusion about past progress in these areas. A particular area of confusion deals with the use of information obtained from incontinent persons to help them in the selection of suitable articles. The burgeoning popularity of the Internet as an e-commerce tool, for example, has led some enthusiasts to think that computer-assisted techniques for obtaining and using information for product selection must be a recent phenomenon, but such is not the case. We have previously documented the significant role of computer-based tools for the marketing of products and the associated gathering of marketing research data (J. Lindsay et al., “The Historic Use of Computerized Tools for Marketing and Market Research,” published as Document 6359D at IP.com, Dec. 27, 2001 (archived at http://search.ip.com/publication_viewer.jsp?pubID=IPCOM000006359D for those with user accounts and more conveniently available at http://www.geocities.com/marketguy555/ or http://www.jefflindsay.com/market-research.shtml). Here we provide additional historic information regarding the role of obtaining information from patients and caregivers about incontinence, with and without computer assistance, both for assessing the quality of life and also for selecting suitable incontinent devices.

 


Dealing with Incontinence and the Quality of Life

Incontinence has long been recognized as a particularly troublesome problem that adversely affects the quality of life of not only the subject but also the caregiver (e.g., see P. Samples, “Taking Care of Care Givers,” To Life!, Summer 1989, p. 15). For the caregiver, it is well known that dealing with incontinent subjects, whether at home or in an institution, brings both mental and physical burdens. Those caring for the incontinent at home also suffer a decrease in personal freedom and loss of free time.

At least some of those skilled in the care of the elderly and the incontinent have long recognized the need to receive and process information obtained from incontinent persons about their situation in order to assist in the selection of suitable articles for the care and treatment of incontinence.

One of many useful resources for clarifying past understanding of practices for helping the incontinent is the work o...