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SLAG REMOVAL FROM LARGE GASIFIERS USING MULTIPLE LOCKHOPPERS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000019969D
Publication Date: 2003-Oct-14
Document File: 4 page(s) / 107K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A method and an apparatus is described to provide for lockhopper valves in a large capacity slagging gasifier, with throughput so as to render a single lockhopper valve for this use unrealistically expensive and difficult to manufacture.

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SLAG REMOVAL FROM LARGE GASIFIERS USING MULTIPLE LOCKHOPPERS

Abstract

A method and an apparatus is described to provide for lockhopper valves in a large capacity slagging gasifier, with throughput so as to render a single lockhopper valve for this use unrealistically expensive and difficult to manufacture.

Background

The current commercial practice for removing slag from slagging gasifiers involves the use of a single lockhopper system situated at the bottom of the quench chamber or, in cases where a gasifier is connected to a syngas cooler, at the bottom of the radiant syngas cooler sump. In many cases a slag crusher is employed immediately upstream of the lockhopper. The slag crusher reduces the size of the slag particles and ensures that the lockhopper system below it does not become plugged with large chunks of slag. The lockhopper system consists of a vertical pressure vessel with large inlet and outlet valves that are operated in such a way as to control the accumulation and discharging of slag from the lockhopper vessel. Other ancillary valves and equipment are used to pressurize, depressurize and flush the lockhopper vessel at various times. All of this is automated by programmable logic controllers and, when properly designed and implemented, it operates very reliably. Those skilled in the art are familiar with the details of the system and the integrated function of all the parts.

As commercial gasifiers have gotten larger in size, and as feeds with larger fractions of ash have been fed to gasifiers, the amount of material that must be handled by the lockhopper system has increased considerably. The ability to move to larger size lockhopper systems is currently limited by the size of commercially available lockhopper valves. The largest commercial gasifiers in operation today employ the largest lockhopper valves currently available with process guarantees from valve manufacturers. For the next generation of even larger gasifiers that is planned for the near future,...