Browse Prior Art Database

Embedded Mobile Telephone Information Collection System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000020013D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Oct-17
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Oct-17
Document File: 7 page(s) / 146K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Thomas R. Klaus: AUTHOR

Abstract

This paper describes an embedded system for information and data collection on calling usage and environments in mobile telephones. With such information repair technicians can more easily understand why a phone has been returned by a consumer and can more effectively and efficiently repair it.

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Embedded Mobile Telephone Information Collection System

by Thomas R. Klaus

Abstract

This paper describes an embedded system for information and data collection on calling usage and environments in mobile telephones. With such information repair technicians can more easily understand why a phone has been returned by a consumer and can more effectively and efficiently repair it.

Problems with Repairing a Mobile Telephone

Cellular telephones operate over a wide range of circumstances and environments, and cellular systems and phone operation continue to become more and more complex. Problems evident to consumers can originate from the land equipment, the mobile equipment, or even an interaction between the two. Operators and retail store locations typically accept consumer returns on a "no questions asked" basis. This situation has lead to a significant problem for repair depots because they have no indication of why the phone was returned, under what conditions it failed, or where to look for a problem. Without such information on a system as complex as a cellular telephone handset, repair technicians conclude that over half of all phones returned by customers are “No Fault Found (NFF).” Some NFF returns are indeed a result of user error or inflated user expectations and not a true fault with the handset, but most are not. When no fault can be found in a truly faulty phone it is typically refurbished and returned to the Operator's seed stock where it is eventually put back in service as a replacement for another failed handset. This situation leads to an ever-increasing handling and repair cost for Operators and phone manufacturers. Most importantly, it is a major cause of dissatisfaction for the consumer who knows his phone has a problem, cannot get that problem resolved, and takes his business elsewhere in frustration.

Description of the Data Collection System

A data collection system could be embedded into the software of mobile phone handsets that collects information on calling usage and environments in each phone. A suggested algorithm flow is shown in Figure 1.

With such information repair technicians can more easily understand how the phone has been typically used, view a record of any abnormal performance or usage conditions, and more quickly and accurately get to the root of the problem the customer is seeing.

This information would include (but is not limited to) the number of calls made and received, their duration, mode of calls, frequency and band of calls, conditions of the call at its start and at its end, transmitter power out, receiver signal strength, handoffs, ambient temperature and power supply voltage. This information could be aggregated for all calls and updated during and after each call in non-volatile memory. Additionally, specific detailed information on the last 100 calls made could be stored in a rolling stack. It is estimated that all this information could be stored in 6K of memory. (See Tables 1 and 2 below...