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Diamond Additives for Golf Balls

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000020339D
Publication Date: 2003-Nov-14
Document File: 5 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A successful golf ball product provides the golfer with distance, control, and reasonable life. These three requirements may not be independently met and are further constrained by professional and amateur regulations designed to promote a uniform field of play. Surprisingly, with only one exception (which is not commercially available), the prior art design concepts and materials of golf ball construction have not included diamond, a material with a mechanical properties and physical properties with a high potential to improve all three desired ball characteristics. The cost of diamond has precluded its evaluation as a golf ball component.

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Diamond Additives for Golf Balls

         A successful golf ball product provides the golfer with distance, control, and reasonable life. These three requirements may not be independently met and are further constrained by professional and amateur regulations designed to promote a uniform field of play. Surprisingly, with only one exception (which is not commercially available), the prior art design concepts and materials of golf ball construction have not included diamond, a material with a mechanical properties and physical properties with a high potential to improve all three desired ball characteristics. The cost of diamond has precluded its evaluation as a golf ball component.
Diamond Additives for Golf Balls

Statement of the Problem         A successful golf ball product provides the golfer with distance, control, and reasonable life. These three requirements may not be independently met and are further constrained by professional and amateur regulations designed to promote a uniform field of play. Even within these constraints, through 23 April, 2002, there were 19,929 patents and applications on file for golf related products. Through the same date in only the year 2002, 43 golf ball related patents have issued and 93 patents have been applied for. Surprisingly, with only one exception (which is not commercially available), the described design concepts and materials of golf ball construction have not included diamond, a material with a mechanical properties and physical properties with a high potential to improve all three desired ball characteristics. The cost of diamond has precluded its evaluation as a golf ball component.

State of The Art         Golf balls must fit within a diameter, weight, velocity, and distance envelope selected for uniform play. Undersize, dense (heavy) balls provide a substantial distance advantage and very strict regulations are set. Within this envelope three ball designs have evolved: the solid ball with a uniform cross section, the molded core ball with multiple layers of molded resin composites, and the wound ball with a core, tensioned fiber interlayer, and a cover. The design and selection of materials in each of the three design types allows the designer to provide a spectrum of products meeting different golfer’s needs for distance, control, and durability. These three product requirements may be further broken down into separate design problems.

Distance is obtained through the effective transmission of club head kinetic energy to the ball and low friction flight. The latter low friction flight is the design goal associated with the various “dimple” patterns on the ball. The ability to store and effectively use club head energy is affected by the elastic properties of the ball, commonly modified by internal, multilayer ball design and material selection for each layer. Ball designers choose higher elastic modulus (stiffer) materials for longer distance balls. Ball makers add tungsten (elastic modulus = 52million psi...