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Foam Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000020496D
Publication Date: 2003-Nov-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Adhesive foams may be formed by blending expandable microspheres into an adhesive composition and expanding the microspheres. An expandable polymeric microsphere is made up of a polymer shell and a core material in the form of a gas, liquid, or combination of gas and liquid. Upon heating to a temperature at or below the melt or flow temperature of the polymeric shell, the polymer shell will expand to form a bubble. Examples of core materials include propane, butane, pentane, isobutane, neopentane, isopentane or a similar materials. Heat may come from a variety of sources such as external heating or internal heating such as generated by the heat of reaction. The latter has been used to make an acrylic adhesive foam by blending unexpanded microspheres in a thickened acrylic composition containing a multifunctional acrylic crosslinking agent and UV photoinitiator. After the blend was mixed with an air mixer and degassed, it was knife-coated onto a UV transparent polyethylene terephthalate (PET) liner and then overlaid with another UV transparent PET liner. The knife coating gap was 0.86 millimeters (34 mils). The coating was cured by simultaneously exposing both sides to UV lights at an average intensity of 3.72 mW/cm2 per side and with a total average energy of 625 mJ/cm2 per side to produce the acrylic foam. The UV lights had 90% of their emission spectra between 300 and 400 nm with a maximum peak intensity at 351 nm.

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         Adhesive foams may be formed by blending expandable microspheres into an adhesive composition and expanding the microspheres. An expandable polymeric microsphere is made up of a polymer shell and a core material in the form of a gas, liquid, or combination of gas and liquid. Upon heating to a temperature at or below the melt or flow temperature of the polymeric shell, the polymer shell will expand to form a bubble. Examples of core materials include propane, butane, pentane, isobutane, neopentane, isopentane or a similar materials. Heat may come from a variety of sources such as external heating or internal heating such as generated by the heat of reaction.

The latter has been used to make an acrylic adhesive foam by blending unexpanded microspheres in a thickened acrylic composition containing a multifunctional acrylic crosslinking agent and UV photoinitiator. After the blend was mixed with an air mixer and degassed, it was knife-coated onto a UV transparent polyethylene terephthalate (PET) liner and then overlaid with another UV transparent PET liner. The knife coating gap was 0.86 millimeters (34 mils). The coating was cured by simultaneously exposing both sides to UV lights at an average intensity of 3.72 mW/cm2 per side and with a total average energy of 625 mJ/cm2 per side to produce the acrylic foam. The UV lights had 90% of their emission spectra between 300 and 400 nm with a maximum peak intensity at 351 nm.