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Version Checker: Mechanism to Restore Version Information from Files Stored in Configuration-Management-Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000020526D
Published in the IP.com Journal: Volume 3 Issue 12 (2003-12-25)
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Dec-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

Software on a PC consists of many binaries, which are generated by compiler and linker out of hundreds or even thousands of source-files. Usually, it is not possible to correlate these binaries to the versions of the used sources, in which they are stored in a Configuration-Management-System (CMS). However, to simplify error corrections, it is advantageous for the customer to have an exact list of the sources, the version of the CMS and the release version of the product. At present this is solved by adding a separate file (resource dll; dynamic link library) to the already existing binary. For every new release, the binaries, even in parts that have not been changed, have to be adapted in this way. The necessary information must be added during each production run, in which the product is generated. Since this method is inefficient and prone to produce errors, it is often not used. This invention proposes to append the relevant information, the complete storage-pathway and the used versions, to the just created file during the software-building process. The information is then stored in the binary code. Since the software-building process is usually done in one central location and is supervised by only one person, this method is less fault-prone. Additionally, it is not necessary for the developer of the source to participate in this process. The complete information can easily be derived from the CMS because a link to the source-storage of the CMS already exists. Examples for elements with complete pathname and version stored in the CMS are:

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Version Checker: Mechanism to Restore Version Information from Files Stored in Configuration-Management-Systems

Idea: Ulrich Schneider, AT-Vienna

Software on a PC consists of many binaries, which are generated by compiler and linker out of hundreds or even thousands of source-files. Usually, it is not possible to correlate these binaries to the versions of the used sources, in which they are stored in a Configuration-Management-System (CMS). However, to simplify error corrections, it is advantageous for the customer to have an exact list of the sources, the version of the CMS and the release version of the product. At present this is solved by adding a separate file (resource dll; dynamic link library) to the already existing binary. For every new release, the binaries, even in parts that have not been changed, have to be adapted in this way. The necessary information must be added during each production run, in which the product is generated. Since this method is inefficient and prone to produce errors, it is often not used. This invention proposes to append the relevant information, the complete storage-pathway and the used versions, to the just created file during the software-building process. The information is then stored in the binary code. Since the software-building process is usually done in one central location and is supervised by only one person, this method is less fault-prone. Additionally, it is not necessary for the developer of the source to participate in this process. The complete information can easily be derived from the CMS because a link to the source-storage of the CMS already exists. Examples for elements with complete pathname and version stored in the CMS are: \pse_vob\JPBPD\pd\pdaaea0u.h@@\main\VC3\VC32\1 \pse_vob\JPBPD\pd\pdacra0d.cpp@@\main\VC3\VC32\1 In addition, the release, date and time information can be attached to the binaries before the installation disk is created:
DATE...