Browse Prior Art Database

Routing Content Over Private Networks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000020612D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Dec-03
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Dec-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 8K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is software for routing content over private networks. In general, in order to utilize, view, or play content authorized for personal use, you need local equipment. For example, to play an audio CD, a CD player is needed. The disclosed software removes the need for many forms of local equipment by utilizing private networks.

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Routing Content Over Private Networks

Disclosed is software for routing content over private networks. In general, in order to utilize, view, or play content authorized for personal use, you need local equipment. For example, to play an audio CD, a CD player is needed. The disclosed software removes the need for many forms of local equipment by utilizing private networks.

Private networks include, but are not limited to, privately operated television networks, radio networks, and computer data networks. These networks are often closed in that they do not readily allow subscribers in the consumer space to transmit data over them.

"Content on demand" allows users to start, stop, rewind, and fast-forward content at will. For example, television movies on demand allow users to start viewing a movie over a private television network at a time that best suits their personal schedule.

The disclosed software uses content on demand to deliver content authorized for personal use from a source location, through the private network, to a target location. The private networks may provide dedicated bandwidth or channel space for personal use content, or may implement a system that seamlessly moves personal use content between different areas of temporarily unused bandwidth or channel space.

Private networks that offer content or services typically implement security features that limit how customers access their networks. For example, in order to view satellite television, customers must have a satellite television tuner that has security authorization to view select channels. These security measures allow on demand content to be viewed only by authorized subscribers. The private networks would be required to provide a secure front end to their network distribution systems. Private networks may be inclined to bill for use content functionality. Copyright mechanisms may be required for source content. For example, a source may be limited in how he can transmit copyrighted material. One mechanism may prevent a source from sending particular content to more than one target at a time. Another may disable the source from utilizing or viewing the content in any form while he is sending the content in question over a private network. Another may be a combination of the two prior mechanisms.

One possible implementation:

1) Source, at a remote location, inserts an audio CD into a...