Browse Prior Art Database

RPR Simulator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000020695D
Original Publication Date: 2004-Jan-25
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Jan-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

Generic analytic methods commonly used to test RPR (Resilient Packet Ring) networks often have to use static models of the networks and reduce the number of considered parameters in order to simplify extensive computations. Especially in very complex networks, with various nodes, various flows and a dynamic bandwidth, this leads to very inaccurate results. By means of the here proposed tool, complete RPR (Resilient Packet Ring) networks can be simulated and their dynamic behavior can be studied to a much higher degree of accuracy. The user only has to provide the exact configuration of the RPR network, consisting of the network's topology (number of nodes, capacity of the ring) and the ingress and egress flow configuration (bandwidth, flow type, etc.). Furthermore, the user can specify what measurements he wants to undertake. The obtained results can then be used to optimize algorithms, such as Fairness and Token Bucket algorithms, and parameters, as for example buffer sizes, prior to actually developing the 'real' Hardware or Software.

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RPR Simulator

Idea: Pedro Teixeira, PT-Amadora; Pedro Gomes, PT-Amadora

Generic analytic methods commonly used to test RPR (Resilient Packet Ring) networks often have to use static models of the networks and reduce the number of considered parameters in order to simplify extensive computations. Especially in very complex networks, with various nodes, various flows and a dynamic bandwidth, this leads to very inaccurate results. By means of the here proposed tool, complete RPR (Resilient Packet Ring) networks can be simulated and their dynamic behavior can be studied to a much higher degree of accuracy. The user only has to provide the exact configuration of the RPR network, consisting of the network's topology (number of nodes, capacity of the ring) and the ingress and egress flow configuration (bandwidth, flow type, etc.). Furthermore, the user can specify what measurements he wants to undertake. The obtained results can then be used to optimize algorithms, such as Fairness and Token Bucket algorithms, and parameters, as for example buffer sizes, prior to actually developing the 'real' Hardware or Software.

Figure 1 shows an implementation of the RPR simulator and the connections inside the RN (Resource Node) module. In this example the number of ports is set to four. As a framework, the freeware-tool OMNeT++ has been used (see http://www.hit.bme.hu/phd/vargaa/omnetpp/).

A similar implementation of a RPR simulator using CNCL (Communications Network Class Library) has already been introduced on several conferences and conference proceedings (e.g. Globecom 2003, IEEE LCN 2003). However, the here proposed simulator features an improved handling and uses a different framework.

© SIEMENS AG 2003 file: 2003J15956.doc page: 1

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Fig. 1

Ring

RN

t oward s

ne x

Conn ec t ion s

ClockWiseOut

RN

Conn ec t ion s

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