Browse Prior Art Database

RFID Locating Systems for Linking Valued Objects with Multimedia Files

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000021113D
Publication Date: 2003-Dec-23

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Jeffrey D. Lindsay: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Many new applications have been proposed for smart tags employing radio frequency identification (RFID) technology. While it is well known to use RFID to track the location of products as they move through portions of the supply chain and in other industrial applications such as baggage handling at airports, less attention has been given to the potential of RFID to assist in the storage and archiving of items and associated information about the items outside of industrial operations. In this paper, we propose a number of RFID-based applications for improved handling of valuable items such as heirlooms and other sentimental items in home use, as well as improved methods for commercial processing of valuable goods and information associated with these goods. Based on recent advances in RFID and multimedia data handling, we propose a variety of hardware and software systems and associated methods to help individuals and groups better deal with valuable items that need to be stored or archived. Though the focus of this paper is on systems for home or other non-commercial use, any of these systems can also be applied to any commercial setting or can be combined with other information-handling and object-tracking technologies

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 6% of the total text.

RFID Locating Systems for Linking
Valued Objects with Multimedia Files

Jeff Lindsay, Walter Reade, Maryellen Vicksta, and Bernie Kressner

Nov. 25, 2003

Introduction

Many new applications have been proposed for smart tags employing radio frequency identification (RFID) technology. While it is well known to use RFID to track the location of products as they move through portions of the supply chain and in other industrial applications such as baggage handling at airports, less attention has been given to the potential of RFID to assist in the storage and archiving of items and associated information about the items outside of industrial operations. In this paper, we propose a number of RFID-based applications for improved handling of valuable items such as heirlooms and other sentimental items in home use, as well as improved methods for commercial processing of valuable goods and information associated with these goods. Based on recent advances in RFID and multimedia data handling, we propose a variety of hardware and software systems and associated methods to help individuals and groups better deal with valuable items that need to be stored or archived. Though the focus of this paper is on systems for home or other non-commercial use, any of these systems can also be applied to any commercial setting or can be combined with other information-handling and object-tracking technologies (e.g., barcode systems, 2-D barcodes, or the nanobarcode systems of Nanoplex Technologies, Inc. of Mountain View, California, described at http://www.nanoplextech.com).

Adapting Technology from Optical Systems

Many concepts developed for image-based information systems can be adapted to RFID systems. For example, past systems have used photographs to create catalogs of inventory, to document the location of objects, or to identify objects. For object identification, image recognition and classification tools, including biometrics, have been used. All of these systems can be enhanced or replaced with RFID-based systems.

Enhancement of an image-based system can occur by combining image-based systems with RFID, relying on RFID to positively identify an object (e.g., a tag with a known serial number is attached to the object, and a scanner can then identify the object from a distance, even when it cannot be viewed). A database of images of various objects can be coupled with their RFID codes, and the location of the object can be determined visually, by RFID scanning, by manual entry of position information, and so forth. The location information can then be linked to the image database and the RFID code. In such a system, a user seeking an object can preview the object in a database, and then perform an RFID scan to find the object, or can locate an object manually and scan its RFID code to retrieve previously obtained image information, including multimedia data such as video recordings of the object in use. Many other combinations of actions can be performed.

An im...